Recruitment and Retention

Background

The Welsh Government, working in collaboration with Local Authorities (LA) and regions is pursuing a programme of reform of the country’s education system and has established a vision for a teaching profession that is attractive, with high morale and professional satisfaction.

However, data from the Welsh Government shows an increase in teachers leaving the profession since 2012. The Education Workforce Council’s (EWC) analysis of data in 2017 found that, ‘despite there not being a recruitment and retention crisis in Wales, there are concerns in four areas: new teachers, headteachers, Welsh-medium teachers, and teachers of STEM subjects’.

To help realise the Welsh Government’s vision, it is important that high-quality entrants are attracted to the teaching profession, that they remain in teaching, and develop as leaders within the system. It is therefore crucial that Carmarthenshire retains its teachers and encourages those who have the potential to make a difference to pupils to choose a career in teaching and progress into leadership within the Authority. It is also crucial that the ERW region is able to gain traction and is able to establish strong professional learning for our teachers and leaders.

The Welsh Government is addressing the need to reform the structure of both initial and ongoing teacher education. It is implementing the recommendations from Professor John Furlong’s report Teaching Tomorrow’s Teachers (Welsh Government, 2015).

 

Recruitment and Career Paths

Education Workforce Council (EWC)

In Wales, the EWC establish and maintain a Register of Education Practitioners. The following charts outline the number of education practitioners currently registered with the EWC.

Chart 1. Number of school teachers registered with EWC by gender

 

 

 

 

 

Chart 2. Number of school teachers registered with EWC by region

Chart 3. Number of school teachers registered with EWC by Local Authority

Routes into Education

To become a teacher and teach in a maintained school in Carmarthenshire, candidates need to gain Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). The routes include:

·         studying at university at undergraduate and postgraduate level

·         employment-based training in a school

All routes focus on the Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) standards.

For academic year 2019/20 there will be four Initial Teacher Education Partnerships for teacher education:

1.       CaBan – (Chester/Bangor North Wales Partnership)

2.       Cardiff Partnership

3.       Yr Athrofa: Professional Learning Partnership

4.       Aberystwyth ITE Partnership

From academic year 2020/21 there will be further Initial Teacher Education Partnerships available for teacher education:

1.       University of South Wales

2.       Swansea University Schools’ Partnership

Chart 4. ITE Results – 2018-19 (Wales)

QTS (Qualified Teacher Status)

All Initial Teacher Education (ITE) trainees must meet the professional standards for teaching and leadership. New standards applied from September 2019 set out what ITE trainees must know, understand and be able to do at the end of their course to gain QTS. The QTS Standards have statutory force and are set out in legislation.

Once trainees have gained QTS and are Newly Qualified Teachers (NQT) they need to undertake their induction.

NQT (Newly Qualified Teachers)

To undertake Induction in Carmarthenshire, NQTs must hold QTS and must be registered with the EWC in the category of school teacher. Schools have a statutory obligation to provide NQTs with Induction support. The Induction period is three school terms, or the equivalent. NQTs who are not employed on a full time basis, or are undertaking Induction via short term supply work must complete a minimum of 380 sessions.

Chart 5. The number of NQTs in Carmarthenshire 2016-19 by gender, age and sector.

Sector

Primary

Secondary

Special

Voluntary Aided

Age-band Total

Age Bands

Male

Female

Sector Total

Male

Female

Sector Total

Male

Female

Sector Total

Male

Female

Sector Total

20-24 Yrs

7

39

46

3

17

20

0

0

0

0

2

2

68

25-29 Yrs

11

36

47

7

35

42

0

0

0

0

4

4

93

30-34 Yrs

2

8

10

4

7

11

0

0

0

0

1

1

22

35-39 Yrs

0

1

1

1

2

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

40-44 Yrs

0

0

0

1

3

4

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

45-49 Yrs

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Total

20

84

104

16

65

81

0

0

0

0

7

7

192

 

Developing Leaders

"School leadership is second only to classroom teaching as an influence on pupil learning.”

All classroom practitioners are leaders either by leading learners or by leading their colleagues in schools. As such, all leaders in Carmarthenshire are encouraged and challenged to support all practitioners to develop and improve as leaders and enable them to develop and improve their colleagues also.

The Welsh Government’s national commitment to continuous professional learning is reflected in the new professional standards for teaching and leadership. In line with the agreed principles of the new professional standards, staff should be fully engaged in identifying the aims and priorities for their own professional learning. In line with the new leadership standards, school leaders have a vital role in making this happen by ensuring that the school’s culture promotes and supports professional learning.

ERW deliver a series of practice-based development programmes for all school practitioners at every stage of the leadership development pathway. Carmarthenshire offers supplementary, bespoke professional learning for all headteachers.

By summer 2020 it is expected that ERW will be delivering a National Development Programme at every stage of the Professional Development Pathway.

The role of the National Academy for Leadership (NAEL)

The establishment of the National Academy for Educational Leadership (NAEL) in May 2018 was a clear response to the need to build leadership capacity across Wales in order that learners can all reach their full potential. NAEL is committed to endorse a number of leadership programmes delivered by stakeholders across Wales.

Currently the National Academy for Educational Leadership has endorsed the following leadership development provision:

·         Middle Leaders, especially their role in developing any aspect of the new curriculum

·         Senior Leaders

·         Aspiring Headteachers (including developing individuals so that they are ready to apply for assessment for the National Professional Qualification for Headship (NPQH).

·         New and Acting Headteachers

·         Experienced Headteachers

 

Schools as Learning Organisations

 

An important theme to consider in our goal to deliver strong leadership across schools in Carmarthenshire is the positive impact of system leadership and effective collaboration between stakeholders on leadership development, well-being and outcomes. This is a crucial aspect for development in education as we create a self-improving system in Carmarthenshire. Leaders in schools need to pursue their own development and facilitate the development of all staff within their schools. Securing effective system leadership across our schools will be secured through implementation of the Schools as Learning Organisations which is currently being promoted and encouraged by Carmarthenshire. A school as a learning organisation (SLO) has a supportive culture and invests time and other resources to ensure teachers can meet these standards. One of the seven SLO dimensions focuses on ‘creating and supporting continuous learning opportunities for all staff.’ Staff who are part of a school that is a learning organisation take responsibility for their professional learning. They are fully engaged in identifying the aims and priorities for their own learning in line with school goals and pupil learning needs, as defined in the school’s development plan. The staff’s professional learning is also based on continuous assessment and feedback that are built into their daily practice. Such reflection, analysis and challenges to established thinking patterns are necessary to bring about and embed the desired change and innovation in educational practice in our schools.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recruitment of staff in Carmarthenshire

The following sections deals with the level of schools staff recruitment in Carmarthenshire.

Chart 6. The number of vacancies in Carmarthenshire 2016-19 (primary schools)

Primary School Vacancies

Post

Type

Number of Vacancies Advertised

Total Applications

Ave. apps per vac

Headteacher

Permanent - Full Time

23

116

5

Deputy Headteacher

Permanent - Full Time

10

105

11

Assistant Headteacher

Permanent - Full Time

2

25

13

Teacher

Permanent - Full Time

6

173

29

Teacher

Temporary - Full Time

25

611

24

Teacher

Temporary - Part Time

5

44

9

Teacher (Foundation Phase)

Permanent - Full Time

11

357

32

Teacher (Foundation Phase)

Temporary - Full Time

29

542

19

Teacher (Foundation Phase)

Temporary - Part Time

1

8

8

Teacher (Key Stage 2)

Permanent - Full Time

11

188

17

Teacher (Key Stage 2)

Permanent - Part Time

1

25

25

Teacher (Key Stage 2)

Temporary - Full Time

31

848

27

Teacher (Key Stage 2)

Temporary - Part Time

4

46

12

Teacher (+SEN1)

Temporary - Full Time

1

9

9

Teacher (Foundation Phase) Observation & Assessment Unit

Temporary - Full Time

2

22

11

Teacher (Head of Key Stage 2 - Curriculum & Assessment)

Permanent - Full Time

1

8

8

Teacher and Co-ordinator (Foundation Phase)

Permanent - Full Time

1

16

16

Teacher ASD

Permanent - Full Time

2

36

18

Teacher of the Deaf

Permanent - Full Time

1

3

3

 

 

Chart 7. The number of headteacher vacancies in Carmarthenshire 2016-19 (primary schools)

Primary Headteacher Vacancies

School

Number of Applications

Bro Banw (2016)

7

Bro Banw (2017)

10

Bro Brynach

2

Bryn (2016)

4

Bryn (2019)

14

Brynamman

5

Dewi Sant

2

Ffairfach

4

Gwenllian

5

Halfway

16

Llandybie

1

Llangadog

3

Llanmiloe

1

Llys Hywel

4

Maes y Morfa

5

Parc-y-Tywyn

7

Peniel

3

Rhys Pritchard

2

Teilo Sant (2016)

2

Teilo Sant (2017)

3

Trimsaran

1

Tycroes

11

Y Bedol

4

 

Generally, there are sufficient numbers of applications per vacancy over a three year period. However, the average number of applications for small and rural schools (13) is lower than for non-small or non-rural schools (18). The number of applications for headteachers in Welsh medium schools is also lower. (Small school – under 50 pupils. Rural school – as defined under the School Organisation Code)

 

Chart 8. The number of vacancies in Carmarthenshire 2016-19 (secondary schools)

Position

Number of adverts 2016-19

Headteacher

4

Deputy Headteacher

5

Assistant Headteacher

2

Head of Faculty

19

Teacher

189

Teaching Assistant

54

ALN Staff

19

Admin / Support Staff

23

Total:

315

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current staffing in schools - Retention

Chart 9. Staffing in schools 2018-2019 by Region and LA

Position on Plasc date 2018

Carmarthenshire is the 4th highest employer of qualified teachers across Wales, including headteachers, deputies and teachers. 10% of Carmarthenshire headteachers are currently acting headteachers.

Chart 10. Qualified teacher profile for Carmarthenshire by sector, gender and age 2018-19

Sector

Primary

Secondary

Special

Voluntary Aided

Age-band Total

Age Bands

Female

Male

Sector Total

Female

Male

Sector Total

Female

Male

Sector Total

Female

Male

Sector Total

20-24 Yrs

31

7

38

15

3

18

0

0

0

1

0

1

57

25-29 Yrs

99

29

128

64

15

79

2

1

3

6

0

6

216

30-34 Yrs

110

32

142

79

32

111

2

0

2

4

1

5

260

35-39 Yrs

110

29

139

83

33

116

6

2

8

22

8

30

293

40-44 Yrs

121

23

144

95

42

137

3

3

3

17

0

17

301

45-49 Yrs

97

24

121

87

50

137

2

1

3

11

3

14

275

50-54 Yrs

89

11

100

59

44

103

5

1

6

9

3

12

221

55-59 Yrs

52

7

59

37

22

59

0

0

0

7

3

10

128

60-64 Yrs

8

1

9

5

7

12

2

0

2

0

0

0

23

65-70 Yrs

1

0

1

3

0

3

0

0

0

1

0

1

6

Including any in year changes.

 

 

Between the 31 October 2016 and 9 January 2017, the Education Workforce Council (EWC) on behalf of the Welsh Government carried out quantitative research study based on the experiences of registered education practitioners working in Wales.

Responses were received from 10,408 (14.4%) of individuals and were broadly representative in each group of the profile on the Register of Education Practitioners held by the EWC. (Further Education and Schools)

Headline findings included:

·         33.6% of school teachers planned to leave the profession within the next three years

·         37.2% enjoyed trying new and innovative teaching methods

·         78.1% said workload was the least rewarding aspect of their role

·         88.3% disagreed or disagreed strongly that they were able to effectively manage their existing workload

Chart 11 Profile of School Teaching Staff Respondents

 

 

 

Key findings for school teachers

·         In terms of what school teachers considered the most rewarding part of their role, the three most selected options were:

·         teaching and seeing learners progress (93.5%);

·         working with others (38.1%);

·         trying new and innovative teaching methods (37.2%).

·         Workload (78.1%), administration (52.0%) and inspections (36.0%) were the aspects that school teachers noted as least rewarding.

·         The most popular response to the question about how they saw their career changing in the next 3 years was continuing to develop practice (47.3%). Followed by 33.6% of respondents who selected leaving the profession. 20.8% of those being under the age of 45. 2.8% of those leaving the profession also indicated they were retiring.  

·         25.8% of school teachers felt that they had full access to the professional development that they needed within the last year, the highest proportion (58.9 %) selected that their access to development had been partly filled.

·         Respondents indicated that conflict with work/not enough time (56.5%) and cost (68.7%) were the main barriers to accessing professional development. 20.2% stated that the relevant professional development was either not available or of sufficient quality.

·         Ability to manage workload within agreed working hours is a key issue with 88.3% either disagreeing or strongly disagreeing that this was achievable.

·         The three most selected areas impacting upon their ability to effectively manage their workload were:

·         administration and paper work (77.4%);

·         fitting curriculum content into the available teaching hours (44.8%);

·         internal and external expectations and accountability (40.7%).

·         On average full time teachers worked 50.7 hours during an average working week and part time teachers an average of 35.8.

·         When asked what they would like more time to be able to do if it was available, the four most selected areas were:

·         discussing work with learners (52.2%);

·         lesson planning and preparation (51.8%);

·         exploring, selecting and developing resources (44.1%);

·         curriculum review, developing schemes of work, researching new topics (41.8%).

 

 

 

 

Chart 12 Summary - How teachers see their careers changing in the next 3 years

With workload and excessive working hours featuring strongly in teacher responses, the following tables highlight the concerns.

Chart 13 The extent teachers able to effectively manage existing workload within agreed working hours

Chart 14 Breakdown of time spent on different aspects

On average full time teachers work 50.7 hours a week and part time teachers an average of 35.8. The School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions Document (STPCD) for England and Wales (section 52.5) indicates that full time teachers can be directed to undertake teaching or other professional duties for a maximum of 1,265 hours over 195 days which is the equivalent of an academic year.

The following table highlights how various aspects of the education system impacts on teachers’ ability to effectively manage their workloads.

Chart 15 External influences that prevent teachers from managing workload

The fundamental problem, as the results of the above data shows, is one of excessive accountability, administration and an overloaded curriculum. Headteachers outline that “inadequate funding” and the pressure of getting good results against a back drop of sliced budgets and the incoming new curriculum is also putting additional pressures on staff in schools.

Staff Leaving the Profession

Further to the above research, a survey of 8,674 National Education Union (NEU) members in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland found that more than a quarter (26%) with between two and five years' experience intend to leave education in the next five years. 40% of respondents said they would be out of the profession by 2024, 18% expect to leave within two years.

However, statistics published by the Welsh Government show that the proportion of teachers leaving the profession (excluding those retiring) in Wales has increased very slightly in recent years. Since 2012, the leaving rate has remained at around three per cent per year for both primary and secondary schools.

 

Chart 16 Carmarthenshire Profile of staff leaving 2016-19 by age, gender and sector

Sector

Primary

Secondary

Special

Voluntary Aided

Age-band Total

Age Bands

Male

Female

Sector Total

Male

Female

Sector Total

Male

Female

Sector Total

Male

Female

Sector Total

20-24 Yrs

2

15

17

0

3

3

0

1

1

0

0

0

21

25-29 Yrs

12

63

75

15

28

43

0

1

1

1

3

4

123

30-34 Yrs

19

39

58

9

24

33

1

0

1

0

1

1

93

35-39 Yrs

16

38

54

9

30

39

1

0

1

3

8

11

105

40-44 Yrs

15

60

75

8

22

30

0

1

1

0

11

11

117

45-49 Yrs

11

28

39

8

28

36

2

0

2

0

5

5

82

50-54 Yrs

6

26

32

16

20

36

1

5

6

0

1

1

75

55-59 Yrs

9

46

55

17

19

36

1

1

2

1

4

5

98

60-64 Yrs

2

22

24

15

18

33

0

0

0

0

1

1

58

65-70 Yrs

1

0

1

0

3

3

0

0

0

0

5

5

9

Total

93

337

430

97

195

292

6

9

15

5

39

44

781

 

Note. Data provided in table includes all staff employed in schools. Data includes all year data.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chart 17 Carmarthenshire reason of staff leaving 2016-19

ANJ

Another Job

ARB

Actuarially Reduced Retirement Benefits

AWAY

Moving Away

CAPR

Career Progression

CCHG

Career Change

CONV

Conversion

DIS

Death in Service

DISM

Dismissal

EFC - 141

End of Fixed Contract

EFF

Organisational Efficiency Reasons

ERT

Early Retirement

FCOM

Family Commitments

IHC

Ill Health - Capability

IHR

Ill Health Retirement

JSAT

Lack of Job Satisfaction

NEW

New Starter

NRT

Normal Retirement

NSC

New Starter Casual

NSP - 162

New Starter Permanent

RED

Redundancy

RESG

Resignation (Reason Not Known)

RESGMA

Resignation - Mutual agreement

SECD

Secondment

SECD04

Secondment

SECD05

Secondment

SECD09

Secondment

TEMP

Temporary Cover

TEMP01

Temporary Cover

TEMP04

Temporary Cover

TEMP05

Temporary Cover

TEMP07

Temporary Cover

TEMP08

Temporary Cover

TEMP09

Temporary Cover

TEMP14

Temporary Cover

TEMP15

Temporary Cover

TOAT

Termination on Agreed Terms

TWD

Transfer Within Department

VRED

Voluntary Redundancy

WLB

Better Work Life Balance

 

 

 

Addressing concerns

Reducing workload

Since 2017, Carmarthenshire, along with several other education organisations in Wales have demonstrated our commitment to help teachers balance their workload. Stakeholders contributed to a joint project launched by the Cabinet Secretary for Education, Kirsty Williams and Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Education, Meilyr Rowlands.

The project was formed in recognition of the burden that the education workforce can feel. This joint working produced a staff room poster and pocket guide, which highlight what teachers should and should not do when they are planning lessons, marking and assessing and collecting data, as well as clarifying Estyn’s expectations.

Changes to accountability

Welsh Government is currently working with the teaching profession, local government, consortia, Estyn, unions and international experts to undertake a fundamental review of the current accountability system. A recent accountability review identified that unintended consequences of the current assessment, evaluation and accountability arrangements and performance measures is placing unnecessary workload for teachers and others in the system, without the necessary impact or benefit for learners. As a Local Authority, will also continue to work with the middle tier on the cultural and behavioural changes needed to support these arrangements. We understand that we must also ensure alignment of each aspect of work and take care to avoid conflicting messages, unnecessary bureaucracy and excessive workload.

Inspection

Estyn will continue to inspect schools. As a response to the report A Learning Inspectorate the nature of inspection will change. Estyn are currently consulting on those arrangements. There will be a partial suspension of inspection from September 2020 to August 2021 to enable the inspectorate to work more closely with schools and consortia on the curriculum reform. However, those schools that continue to give cause for concern will be monitored by Estyn during this time and will continue to receive support from their regional consortia and local authorities. Moving forward Estyn will change the way they undertake their inspections. This will involve the validation of the school’s self-evaluation and improvement processes and will take place more regularly than in the current cycle.

Preparing for the new curriculum

The approach to professional learning and the new curriculum are being developed in tandem to ensure that immediate and emerging professional learning requirements are taken forward in a planned and structured way. At the root of current reforms is our goal of developing a self-improving system. That is a deliberate step away from the top-down approach of the past, where the Government directs, instructs and sanctions, to one where it provides strategic leadership, facilitation and support. There needs to be significant investment by the ERW region to develop capacity to support the transition to a school led system through networks, triads and mentors to support school to school working focused on practitioner inquiry and joint practice development.