Revised Carmarthenshire Local Development Plan 2018 – 2033

 

 

Draft Pre-Deposit Preferred Strategy

 

Report to Community Scrutiny

Foreword

(Insert)

 

Contents:

 

Policy Index                                                                                      Page

 

1.                      Introduction                                                                       

2.                      What is the Preferred Strategy?

3.                      What is in the Preferred Strategy?

4.                      Influences on the Plan

5.                      Carmarthenshire – Strategic Context

6.                      Issues Identification

7.                      A Vision for ‘One Carmarthenshire’

8.                      Strategic Objectives

9.                      Strategic growth and Spatial Options

10.                  A New Strategy

11.                  Strategic Policies

 

Glossary

 

Appendices

Appendix 1: Policy Assessment

Appendix 2: Strategic Sites - Maps


 

Policy Index

 

Strategic Policy – SP 1: Strategic Growth

Strategic Policy – SP 2: Retail and Town Centres

Strategic Policy – SP 3: Providing New Homes

Strategic Policy – SP 4: Affordable Homes

Strategic Policy – SP 5: Strategic Sites

Strategic Policy – SP 6: Employment and the Economy

Strategic Policy – SP 7: Welsh Language and Culture

Strategic Policy – SP 8: Infrastructure

Strategic Policy – SP 9: Gypsy and Traveller Provision

Strategic Policy – SP 10: The Visitor Economy

Strategic Policy – SP 11: Placemaking, Sustainability and High Quality Design

Strategic Policy – SP 12: Rural Development

Strategic Policy – SP 13: Protection and Enhancement of the Natural Environment

Strategic Policy – SP 14: Protection and Enhancement of the Built and Historic Environment

Strategic Policy – SP 15: Climate Change

Strategic Policy – SP 16: Sustainable Distribution – Settlement Framework

Strategic Policy – SP 17: Transport and Accessibility

Strategic Policy – SP 18: Mineral Resources

Strategic Policy – SP 19: Waste Management

 


 

1.           Introduction

1.1       The Council is responsible for preparing and keeping up-to-date the Local Development Plan (LDP)[1].  The LDP sets out planning policies and allocates sites for different types of development.  The Council is also responsible for development management which involves the processing and determination of planning applications with the LDP guiding and managing development by providing the foundation for consistent and clear decision making.  In meeting the above responsibilities we are in the process of preparing a Revised LDP.  Once adopted we will use this LDP for assessing planning applications through until 2033 but will continue to monitor and review its content to ensure it remains relevant and is working as intended.

 

1.2       The LDP has a direct and meaningful effect on the people and communities of Carmarthenshire and visitors alike.  It will shape the future development in the County and its environmental qualities, influencing it economically and socially. The LDP will respond to the needs of a growing and regionally important economy making provision for new jobs, homes, infrastructure and community facilities. It also ensures the well-being of its communities is maintained, and the impacts of the development and use of land are managed sustainably.  It will guide funding and investment programmes, other plans and strategies, communities and landowners whilst providing for the enhancement and protection of our environment and environmental qualities.  In doing so, it provides a measure of certainty and confidence about what kind of development will, and will not, be permitted and at what locations during the Plan period.

 

1.3       The part of Carmarthenshire which is within the Brecon Beacons National Park has its own separate development plan.

 

1.4       In ensuring that the current adopted LDP remains up to date, a review was undertaken into its content with the outcomes published in the Review Report[2].  This review, whilst finding that many aspects of the adopted LDP are functioning effectively, also identified that there were issues in relation to parts of the Plan and its strategy.  The Review Report showed that parts of this strategy were not being delivered as intended with both the level and spatial distribution of growth requiring further consideration.  It concluded that we start the preparation of a revised LDP to replace the existing adopted Plan.  The Revised LDP 2018 – 2033 will replace the current adopted Plan on adoption which is scheduled for December 2021.


 

2.           What is the Preferred Strategy?

2.1       This Preferred Strategy is part of a set of documents which we are required to prepare in the process of producing the Revised LDP for Carmarthenshire.  It represents an early but important early stage in preparing the Plan and follows the publication of the Delivery Agreement as approved by the Welsh Government on the 28th June 2018[3].  

 

2.2       The purpose of this Preferred Strategy is to set the long term vision for Carmarthenshire (excluding that area within the Brecon Beacons National Park) and the strategic objectives and the strategic land use polices to deliver that vision.  

 

2.3       It will provide the strategic direction for the development and use of land until 2033. It also tells us how much development is needed and broadly where this is likely to be.  However, this Preferred Strategy is not the full LDP, rather it sets out broad strategic principles for development in our area.  The full Plan is called the Deposit LDP and will contain detailed and specific policies as well as settlement maps, development limits, site-specific allocations (housing sites) etc. 

   

 

2.4       Further information on the stages in preparing the LDP is available within the Delivery Agreement or on the Council’s web-pages.

 

2.5       This Preferred Strategy should be read and considered as a whole having regard to the provisions of Planning Policy Wales and the relevant Technical Advice Notes.


 

3.           What is in the Preferred Strategy?

3.1       The format and structure of the Preferred Strategy has sought to reflect the core elements of sustainability, along with the four well-being objectives within the Carmarthenshire Well-being Plan[4].  The Strategic Policies will follow this structure with cross-referencing to the relevant Plan objectives, as well as the relevant Well-being goals.

 

3.2       This Draft Preferred Strategy will be made available for public consultation, aimed at engaging with communities, the public, partners, developers and interest groups.  

What is NOT included within this Preferred Strategy include:

 

·       Site specific allocations or development limits/settlement boundaries, for example housing or employment sites. These will be identified in the Deposit LDP;

·       Detailed or specific planning policies– additional and more specific policies to support the Strategic Policies.  These will be included in the Deposit LDP; and

·       A detailed evaluation of the Candidate Sites submitted – the register of candidate sites is available to view as is the Site Assessment Methodology which we will use to look at the suitability of each site.

 

3.3       The Sustainability Appraisal of the Draft Preferred Strategy has been published as a separate document along with the Habitat Regulations Assessment Screening Report.  Both these documents are available for consultation with comments welcomed on their content.


 

4.           Influences on the Plan

4.1       Whilst the LDP plays a key role in shaping decision making and the location and nature of developments within the County, it is prepared and operated within the national framework set through legislation and by Planning Policy Wales[5]  and accompanying Technical Advice Notes[6].

 

4.2       The process itself for the preparation of the LDP is set within statutory regulations, with further procedural guidance contained within the LDP Manual as prepared by the Welsh Government.  The preparation and content of the LDP will be assessed against three tests of soundness[7] namely:

 

1.         Does the plan fit?

2.         Is the plan appropriate?

3.         Will the plan deliver?

 

4.3       The preparation of the Plan will culminate with the Planning Inspector (as appointed by the Welsh Government).  The Inspector will examine the LDP against these three tests to assess its soundness. The findings of the Examination will be published in the Inspector’s Report, and its content and recommendations are binding on the Authority.

 

4.4       As the Council plans for the future, we must also work closely with, and respond to, various partners, other agencies, funding bodies and decision makers to inform, guide and implement programmes and proposals. The LDP, whilst central in informing future policies, programmes and investment strategies across a range of agencies and bodies will have also been influenced by, and reflect those which support the delivery of its policies and proposals.

 

4.5       A number of important documents and strategies relate to Carmarthenshire. We have and will, where applicable, prepare the plan to reflect such documents and plans of other organisations, including our neighbouring planning authorities, and national and regional policies and strategies.  We will work with our neighbours and others in the preparation of the LDP as appropriate.

 

4.6       There have been a number of significant contextual changes in Welsh legislation since the adoption of the current LDP. These include the publication of the Planning (Wales) Act 2015 and the Environment (Wales) Act 2016.  Perhaps most significant however, is the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015.  This represents a big change, with the Plan required to contribute to its aims of improving the economic, social, environmental and cultural well-being of Wales as part of carrying out sustainable development.  The Plan will look to the national well-being goals and objectives as well as the Council’s own well-being objectives[8] in its policies and proposals.

 

4.7       The Council, in preparing its New Corporate Strategy, consolidated the following plans into the one document and will underpin many aspects of the LDP in moving forward:

 

1.   It supersedes the 2015-20 Corporate Strategy;

2.   It incorporates our Improvement Objectives as required by the Local Government Measure 2009;

3.  It includes our Well-being Objectives as required by the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015. For the first time in Wales, there is a shared vision and set of goals for all public bodies to work towards, our Well-being Objectives are set to maximise our contribution to these,

4. It includes Carmarthenshire County Council’s Executive Board key projects and programmes for the next 5 years as set out in ‘Moving Forward in Carmarthenshire: the next 5 years’.

 

 

 

4.8       This Draft Preferred Strategy also reflects the Sustainability Appraisal (SA) Scoping Report[9] giving full and careful consideration of all the relevant factors it identified.  As we continue the process of preparing the Plan, the SA and the requirements for producing the Habitat Regulations Assessment (HRA) will help us in developing the LDP in a way which ensures it takes on board those sustainability and environmental values.

 

4.9       Such contextual changes, the findings of the Review Report and changes in evidence will be important in informing how the Plan is prepared, and its direction both strategically through this Draft Preferred Strategy, but also at a detailed policy level.

 

4.10     Extensive work and liaison has, and is, being undertaken to build and raise awareness and communication with a wide range of organisations and individuals. The information, issues and evidence emerging from such communications has been invaluable in the work undertaken to date and will continue in ensuring the preparation of the LDP is as informed and consensual as possible.


 

5.           Carmarthenshire - Strategic Context

Overview

5.1       Carmarthenshire is positioned at the heart of south west Wales.  It enjoys strong links to wider economies both to the east and across into England, but also west to Pembrokeshire and Ireland as well mid and north Wales. Carmarthenshire boasts a dynamic economic base, reflecting its strong employment centres as well as a having an important rural economy.  The County has been successful in attracting investment, and places regeneration as its number one corporate priority.

 

5.2       The County is characterised by its diverse towns and villages, large employment parks, regional retail centres, prominent rural economy, and attractive upland, estuarine and coastal landscapes. The Welsh language and culture are also important aspects of Carmarthenshire’s identity and character with the County prominent as a heartland for Welsh speakers.

 

5.3       Within the County there are key economic drivers including the investments at Cross Hands in relation to the food park and the Cross Hands East employment site.  The signing of the £1.3billion city deal in 2017 and the progress in delivering the associated projects - Yr Egin Creative Cluster in Carmarthen and the Llanelli Well-being and Life Sciences project - reinforces Carmarthenshire’s strategic and regional importance.

Carmarthenshire is a County with a diverse character with the agricultural economy and landscape of the rural areas juxtaposed with the urban and post-industrial south-eastern area.

 

5.4       As a primarily rural County, the population density is low at 75.7 persons per sq. kilometre, compared with 140 persons per sq. kilometre for Wales as a whole. This sparsity of population is reflective of the largely rural communities as opposed to the south and east of the County where 65% of the population reside on 35% of the land.

 

5.5       The main urban centres of the County include Llanelli, Carmarthen and Ammanford / Cross Hands.  Carmarthen due to its central geographic location typically serves the needs of the County’s rural hinterland as well as the wider region in aspects such as retailing. Both Llanelli and Ammanford / Cross Hands have a rich industrial heritage but remain important contributors to their wider communities acting a focal points for employment and homes.

5.6       The County has a large number of settlements reflecting the size and diversity of the County.  These vary in size and role with many often making notable contributions to the needs and requirements of their community and the surrounding area.  A number of settlements and villages are self-sufficient in terms of facilities and services, often fulfilling a wider service role. However, other smaller settlements lack services and facilities. The needs of residents in these latter areas are typically met by main centres and in some instances the other serviced smaller settlements.

 

5.7       The richness of Carmarthenshire’s natural and cultural environment is an important spatial consideration in planning for the future of the County, particularly in terms of the potential for growth and the siting of development. The plan area includes sites designated at the international level to protect and enhance important nature conservation value, as well as striking landscapes and distinctive historic towns and villages. The importance of the County’s built heritage is borne out by the 27 conservation areas, 366 Scheduled Ancient Monuments (ranging from Prehistoric to post- Medieval/Modern features of cultural historic interest) and the large number of listed buildings. There are also a number of designated sites for nature conservation and biodiversity importance, including 8 Special Areas of Conservation, 3 Special Protection Areas, 1 Ramsar site, 90 Sites of Special Scientific Interest, 5 National Nature Reserves, 5 Local Nature Reserves and 7 registered landscapes.

Agriculture in Carmarthenshire dominates the rural landscape with the agricultural industry and in particular dairy and sheep farming establishing the County as one of the most important agricultural areas in Wales. Some 203,700 ha of land within Carmarthenshire is classified as agricultural land with the majority classified as grade 3a and 4 with a small tranche of grade 2 land in the south-east of the County.

 

Population

5.8       Carmarthenshire is home to around 6% of Wales’ total population with 186,452 people. Since 2001, the County has seen its population grow by 12,800 people, a 7.4% increase in 16 years. The highest level of population growth was recorded before 2008, with the years since showing a lower level of growth.

 

5.9       The main factor influencing population change in Carmarthenshire since 2001/2002 has been through inward migration, where more people have come into the County than have left. The population growth is also considered against the County’s natural change which has seen the number of deaths exceeding births each year since 2001/2002.  

 

5.10     Migration patterns out of Carmarthenshire has seen a large number of the 15-19 age group leave the County.  This largely reflects students leaving the County for higher education opportunities. There is an increase of people moving into the County within the 30-44 young family age group and the 0-14 year age group. There is also an increase in the over 65 age group which has contributed to Carmarthenshire’s ageing population profile.

 

5.11     Since the inception of the Local Development Plan process in Wales, the Welsh Government has published four population and household projections.  The 2006 and 2008 WG based projections have been influenced by high net migration statistics (internal and international) which identified significant growth for Carmarthenshire (as reflected in the Adopted LDP). However the WG 2011 and 2014-based projections reflected a post-recession phase which indicated a lower in-migration trend which has translated into a much lower anticipated household growth requirement for Carmarthenshire.

 

5.12     Looking ahead to the Revised LDP 2018-2033, the latest Welsh Government 2014-based household projections estimates that average household sizes are not decreasing as quickly as previous projections suggested. This higher estimate of household sizes coupled with the changes in population growth within the County has resulted in a much lower anticipated household requirement from that identified in the existing adopted LDP.

 

Connections

5.13     Carmarthenshire is well located on the strategic highway network with connections to the west provide links to the Irish ferry ports, which with the M4 forms part of the Trans-European Network. This east-west link is further emphasised by the West Wales railway line which extends from Swansea (and the wider rail network) through to Pembrokeshire via Carmarthen and Llanelli. The West Wales line also forms part of the Trans-European Network linking to and from the Irish Ferry Ports in Pembrokeshire. The Heart of Wales railway line extending from Swansea through eastern parts of the County through to Shrewsbury offers additional transport benefits albeit based on a limited service.

 

5.14     The County is also served by a number of A-roads as well as numerous B-classified roads each representing important components of the highway network. Our principal highway network includes the A48 trunk road leading to and from the M4 motorway with its connections through South East Wales and beyond. Whilst the A40 and A483 trunk roads connect to Mid and North Wales as well as to the Midlands and the North of England. Access into Central and onwards into North Wales is provided via the A484 and the A485.

5.15     The following illustrates the nature of the road network including the level of provision which is met through B and lower classification roads.  This in part reflects of the rural extent of the County and emphasises the challenges to delivering a sustainable integrated strategy for the area.

Carmarthenshire Road Network – Road Length (Km)

Motorway (M4)

5

Class A (Trunk)

147

Class A (County)

247

Class B and C

1,579

Minor Surfaced

1,496

 

5.16     The area is generally well served by public transport through the bus network, albeit with the level and frequency of service subject to variation dependent upon location and destination. In addition, a number of services operate on a ‘Hail-&-Ride’ basis in rural areas and ‘Bwcabus’ in the Teifi Valley, such services offer additional accessibility benefits to such areas.


 

6.           Issues Identification

 

6.1       The Revised LDP needs to be strategic, concise and distinctive to our County. Focusing on the key issues facing our County has helped us achieve this.[10] In preparing the revised LDP we have sought to review and update our understanding of the relevant issues.

 

6.2       The key issues are grouped under the national well-being goals. This means that the issues are framed within the context of the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015[11]. This ensures that social, economic and environmental interests are embedded into the Plan making process.  

 

6.3       The SA Scoping report, as well as the work undertaken by the Public Service Board as part of the “Carmarthenshire We Want”[12] process, has informed the issues. The Carmarthenshire Wellbeing Plan 2018 – 2033 [13] has also been a key aspect of this work.

 

6.4       We have engaged and researched extensively as part of the conversation around issues generation. This includes elected Members, Town and Community Councils, Key Stakeholder Forum, policy review, LDP review report, corporate objectives/strategies, online surveys and the Sustainability Appraisal (SA) process[14].

 

6.5       We understand where we are now as a County and where we all want to get to. This has allowed for the development of a consensus on those issues that a spatial / land use plan can seek to address up to 2033.

 

6.6       The 33 summary issues are as follows. Further detail is set out within the Issues Vision and Objectives Topic Paper[15]:

 

 

 

A Prosperous Carmarthenshire

1 The £1.3 billion Swansea Bay City Deal, with projects identified in Llanelli and Carmarthen.

2 Varying vibrancy and vitality within our retailing town centres

3 Appropriate growth is needed in rural areas (including employment opportunities)

4 A buoyant Visitor economy with potential to grow.

A Resilient Carmarthenshire

5 Risks from flooding and the challenges presented by climate change

6 Biodiversity designations ranging from the international to local level.

7 An ecological footprint that is currently exceeding sustainable levels.

8 Rich landscape or townscape qualities.

A Healthier Carmarthenshire

9 An ageing population.

10 60% of adults reported as being overweight or obese.

11 Community life, education and public services indicate wellbeing in rural areas.

12 Beauty, peace and quiet, open green spaces and fresh air are also contributors to happiness in rural areas.

13 Air Quality Management Areas in Carmarthen, Llanelli and Llandeilo.

14 “Our big NHS change” and any implications.

A More Equal Carmarthenshire

15 Rural and urban deprivation.

16 Over 1 in 3 households are living in poverty.

17 Council’s target to provide 1,000 affordable homes.

A Carmarthenshire of Cohesive Communities

18 Lack of new homes being built in some Service Centres and Local Service Centres.

19 Lack of a five year supply of housing land and the need for a housing mix.

20 Changes in population and household forecasts indicate that significantly less homes are needed through to 2033.

21 Housing sites not being brought forward and built

22 A predominantly rural county where 60% of the population live in rural areas.

23 Ensuring infrastructure capacity can support development, including highways.

24 The need to promote and access alternative forms of transport.

25 Lack of employment opportunities, broadband and public services in rural areas.

26 Need to appreciate the sense of place – a county of contrasts.

A Carmarthenshire of Vibrant Culture and Thriving Welsh Language

27 Disused buildings across the County.

28 Need to measure the impact of development upon the Welsh language

29 Need for affordable housing within our communities to retain young families

30 Important archaeological sites and historic features

31 Highest number of Welsh speakers in Wales

A Globally Responsible Carmarthenshire

 

32 Emerging national and regional considerations including Brexit, National Development Framework, Strategic Development Plans and the review of Planning Policy Wales (Edition 10).

33 Need to promote energy efficiency in proposed and existing developments.


 

7.            A Vision for ‘One Carmarthenshire’

7.1       The Revised LDP needs to be underpinned by a concise, long-term vision and strategy. In order to achieve this, a clear Vision has been developed that is built on consensus. This Draft Preferred Strategy’s Vision outlines how the County is planned to develop, change or be conserved up to 2033.[16]

 

7.2       The Revised LDP vision directly incorporates the vision set out in the Council’s Corporate Strategy “Moving Forward in Carmarthenshire - the next 5 years – 2018-2023”[17]. Whilst there is no vision to directly draw upon from the Carmarthenshire Wellbeing Plan, the Revised LDP vision reflects its four well-being objectives which are (1) Healthy Habits (2) Early Intervention (3) Strong Connections and (4) Prosperous People and Places.

 

7.3       The supporting text of well-being objective 4 has been incorporated into the Revised LDP vision due to this objective’s emphasis on “maximising opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county”. This responds to the strong emphasis on recognising rural areas within the conversations undertaken around issues identification. The Revised LDP vision acknowledges and celebrates that our county is one of contrast and engenders a sense of place.

 

7.4       A “One Carmarthenshire” approach recognises the need to balance conflicting demands and interests and provides a platform for consensus and shared ownership of the Revised LDP. The Revised LDP vision also recognises the Swansea Bay City Deal and this sets the tone for this Draft Preferred Strategy to be positive and sufficiently aspirational.

 

One Carmarthenshire

Carmarthenshire 2033 will be a place to start, live and age well within a healthy, safe and prosperous environment, where its rich cultural and environmental qualities are valued and respected.

It will have prosperous, cohesive and sustainable communities providing increased opportunities, interventions and connections for people, places and organisations in both rural and urban parts of our County.

It will have a strong economy that reflects its position as a confident and ambitious driver for the Swansea Bay City Region.

8.           Strategic Objectives

8.1       The current Adopted LDP’s strategic objectives were utilised as a starting point for the identification of strategic objectives for the Revised LDP.

 

8.2       The emergence of a range of contextual and policy drivers since 2014, most notably the Well Being of Future Generations Act 2015 and the signing of the Swansea Bay City Deal in 2017, mean that the Adopted LDP Strategic Objectives needed review.  There was also a need to ensure to ensure that the Revised LDP strategic objectives were interwoven with the Revised LDP key issues and vision.

 

8.3       The Carmarthenshire Well Being Plan’s wellbeing objectives have been utilised to group the Revised LDP’s Strategic Objectives. This ensures that a local interpretation of wellbeing is interwoven into the strategic objectives and the Plan’s strategy from the outset.

Whilst not directly identified as Revised LDP strategic objectives in themselves, the Council’s wellbeing objectives, as outlined within the Corporate Strategy “Moving Forward in Carmarthenshire - the next 5 years – 2018-2023  have played an informing role. The Issues Vision and Objectives Topic Paper contains compatibility assessments between the Revised LDP strategic objectives, the Revised LDP strategic objectives and the Council’s wellbeing objectives and the Revised LDP strategic objectives against the Sustainability Appraisal framework.

 

8.4       The Revised LDP strategic objectives are sufficiently aspirational and ambitious but are also deliverable within a spatial planning context. They respond and deliver upon the Plan’s key issues and provide a platform for delivering its vision. They provide a platform for a Sound Plan, notably in terms of their fit, appropriateness and deliverability [18]

The strategic objectives are cross referenced to the relevant Revised LDP issue and are also subject to an analysis in terms of whether they are SMART (Specific Measurable Attainable Relevant and Time Bound).


 

8.5       The Revised LDP strategic objectives are below.

Healthy Habits - People have a good quality of life, and make healthy choices about their lives and environment.

SO1 To ensure that the natural environment, including habitats and species, are safeguarded and enhanced.

LDP Issues addressed

6, 7, 12, 13, 26, 32

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

 

SO2 To assist with widening and promoting wellbeing opportunities through access to community, leisure and recreational facilities as well as the countryside.

LDP Issues addressed

10, 11, 12, 15, 22, 26, 32

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

 

SO5 To safeguarded and enhance the built and historic environment and promote the appropriate reuse of redundant buildings.

LDP Issues addressed

8, 26, 27, 30, 32

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

Early Intervention - To make sure that people have the right help at the right time; as and when they need it

SO3 To assist in widening and promoting education and skills training opportunities for all.

LDP Issues addressed

11, 15, 16, 22, 25, 26, 32

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

 

SO4 To ensure that the principles of equal opportunities and social inclusion are upheld by promoting access to a high quality and diverse mix of public services, healthcare, shops, leisure facilities and work opportunities, as well as vibrant town centres.

LDP Issues addressed

2, 3, 9, 11, 14,16,18, 22, 25, 26, 32

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

Strong Connections - Strongly connected people, places and organisations that are able to adapt to change

SO6 To ensure that the principles of spatial sustainability are upheld by directing development to sustainable locations with access to services and facilities and wherever possible encouraging the reuse of previously developed land.

LDP Issues addressed

5, 7,13, 22, 23, 26, 32

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

 

SO7 To make a significant contribution towards tackling the cause and adapting to the effect of climate change, including promoting the efficient use and safeguarding of resources.

LDP Issues addressed

5, 7,13, 24, 26, 32, 33

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

 

SO8 To contribute to the delivery of an accessible integrated and sustainable transport system, including links to alternative transport methods.

LDP Issues addressed

22 ,23 , 24, 26, 32

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

 

 

 

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

SO9 To protect and enhance the diverse character, distinctiveness, safety and vibrancy of the County’s communities by promoting a place making approach and a sense of place.  

LDP Issues addressed

8, 26, 28, 31, 32

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

 

SO10 To make provision for an appropriate mix of quality homes across the County based around the principles of sustainable socio-economic development and equality of opportunities.

LDP Issues addressed

3, 17, 18,19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 26,28, 29, 32

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

 

SO11 To assist in protecting, enhancing and promoting the Welsh Language and the County’s unique cultural identity, assets and social fabric.

LDP Issues addressed

3, 17, 18, 20, 26, 28, 29, 31, 32

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

 

SO12 To encourage investment & innovation in rural and urban areas by making adequate provision to meet employment need and to contribute at a regional level to the delivery of the Swansea Bay City Deal.

LDP Issues addressed

1, 2, 3, 4, 15, 16, 23, 25, 26, 32

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

 

 

 

SO13 To make provision for sustainable & high quality all year round tourism related initiatives.

LDP Issues addressed

4, 25, 26, 32

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

 

SO14 To reflect the requirements associated with the delivery of new development, both in terms of hard and soft infrastructure (including broadband).

LDP Issues addressed

23, 24, 25, 26, 32

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time Bound

ü

Aspirational and Ambitious

ü

 

(Insert LDP Vision and Process Chart)


 

9.           Strategic Growth and Spatial Options

Strategic Growth Options

9.1       To inform the future direction of population and household growth within Carmarthenshire, the Council has undertaken a Population and Household Forecast Paper which highlights various population-led and employment-led growth options scenarios for the revised LDP period of 2018-2033. Each scenario is considered against the 2011 Census vacancy rate, in addition to a variant vacancy rate calculated from Carmarthenshire’s council tax records, which is calculated as 3.4%.

 

9.2       The Population and Household Forecast Paper also identifies the links between population growth and estimated employment growth. This is correlated by identifying how population growth and variances in the labour force and demographics supports job opportunities and economic growth.

 

WG 2014-based projection

9.3       The starting point for the analysis of future growth outcomes for Carmarthenshire is through the Welsh Government’s (WG) 2014-based population and household projections. The 2014-based projections are the latest available. They incorporate the ONS 2014 mid-year population estimate, plus fertility, mortality and migration assumptions based on an historical five-year period prior to 2014.

 

9.4       The 2014-based projections are notably lower than that estimated under each of the previous WG projections. This is because they are based on a 5 year period of lower net in-migration, particularly given the impact of the recession, whilst household sizes have not decreased as quickly as previously considered. It would see a high percentage increase of 65+ year old persons which would provide a real challenge for the delivery of health and social care services within the County.

 

9.5       Housing build rates within Carmarthenshire since 2007 have been (on average) 493 houses per year. Adopting the 2014-based projection as the Preferred Strategy would result in a far lower level of growth with on average 231 dwellings per annum using the Census vacancy rate, or 224 dwellings per annum on the alternative vacancy rate being required for the revised LDP period of 2018-2033.

 

9.6       It is recognised that there is a link between providing for new houses and new jobs. The 2014-based projectionwould stifle any future development opportunity for the county and would mean that the Corporate drive for new employment growth would not be met, and be in conflict with other elements of the LDP strategy.

 

9.7       This scenario would have a significant impact on the labour force within Carmarthenshire resulting in a net outflow of workers and residents from the County. This scenario would estimate a negative job creation value of -55 per year.

 

Conclusion

9.8       Using this growth trend as the Preferred Strategy for Carmarthenshire would adversely impact upon the Council’s strategic ambitions from both an economic and social perspective. Furthermore given the potential negative impacts highlighted above, it is not considered prudent to utilise the WG 2014-based projection in the revised LDP Preferred Strategy.

 

9.9       Using this scenario would not deliver the Plan’s Vision and Strategic Objectives.

 

Other Projection Options

9.10     The forecast paper highlights 5 other demographic scenario options of population and household growth for Carmarthenshire – each considering various statistics to inform a potential growth trend within the county.

 

 

Change 2018-2033

Average per year

Total Dwelling Growth (Census VR)

Total Dwelling Growth (ALT. VR)

Scenario

Population Change

 Population Change %

Household Change

Household Change %

Net Migration

Dwellings (Census VR)

Dwellings (ALT. VR)

PG Pre-Recession

26,811

14.2%

13,616

16.6%

2,028

969

939

14,529

14,090

PG Long Term

17,567

9.4%

9,555

11.7%

1,423

680

659

10,195

9,887

PG 10yr

11,755

6.3%

6,992

8.6%

1,043

497

482

7,461

7,236

PG Short Term

10,691

5.7%

6,807

8.4%

997

484

470

7,263

7,044

(WG 2014 (10yr Average Migration

10,842

5.8%

6,322

7.7%

921

450

436

6,746

6,542

WG 2014 based

3,207

1.7%

3,254

4.0%

546

231

224

3,472

3,367

 

WG 2014-based (10 year average migration) projection

9.11     This projection utilises the WG 2014-based natural change assumptions but also considers the 10 year migration period between 2003/2004 and 2012/13. This trend uses a migration period prior to, and post-recession, which would see a population and household change of 5.8% and 7.7% respectively during the plan period of 2018-2033. The housing requirement within this scenario (2011 Census vacancy rate) would equate to 450 dwellings per year, which would be less than that currently being built within Carmarthenshire on an average yearly basis. This equates to 6,746 dwellings over the LDP period 2018-2033.

In considering this projection against the variant vacancy rate of 3.4%, the dwelling requirement within this scenario reduces to 436 dwellings per year. This equates to 6,542 dwellings over the LDP period 2018-2033.

 

9.12     This scenario would estimate the creation of 198 additional jobs per year, far less than that considered within the Carmarthenshire’s Strategic Regeneration Plan.

 

Conclusion

9.13     Given the potential negative impacts highlighted above, it is not considered prudent to utilise both variant scenarios of the WG 2014-based (10 year average migration) projection as the growth option for the revised LDP Preferred Strategy. It would not deliver the Plan’s Vision and Strategic Objectives.

 

9.14     Both variant scenarios would limit Carmarthenshire’s economic ambitions in terms of job creation and keeping younger adults within the County to live and work.

 

Population Growth Short Term

9.15     The Population Growth (PG) Short Term scenario utilises part of the WG 2014-based projection migration data, however it also uses the three years of data up to 2016/2017. This scenario increases the population and household change percentage from that in the 2014-based projection, but the outflow of those within the 15-19 age cohort increases. The PG short term trend increases the net migration inflow of all ages from 30+ years, but it would still see a negative population percentage change within the under 65 age cohorts.

 

9.16     Utilising the 2011 Census vacancy rate, this scenario would, on average deliver 484 dwellings per year within the Revised LDP period, or 470 dwellings per year under the variant vacancy rate. This equates to 7,263 dwellings and 7,044 dwellings over the revised LDP period respectively. This is notably less than that currently being built within Carmarthenshire on an annual basis. Whilst there is a net inflow in the 30 + age cohorts, the rate of growth would be slower and limit the economic potential of the authority. This reinforces some of the issues highlighted in terms of economic ambition and having balanced age cohorts within the county.

 

9.17     In terms of the link between population change and job creation, this scenario would support the creation of 126 additional jobs per year, but would fall short of the targets outlined in Carmarthenshire’s Strategic Regeneration Plan.

 

Conclusion

9.18     Given the potential negative impacts highlighted above, it is not considered prudent to utilise the PG Short Term projection as the growth option for the Preferred Strategy. It would not deliver the Plan’s Vision and Strategic Objectives.

 

Population Growth 10 year

9.19     The PG 10 year projection utilises the migration trend of the previous 10 years, which takes into account the first two years of the pre-recession period, but with the majority of the migration data being since 2008. This trend offers a slightly more optimistic outlook than that considered in the 10 year migration data from the WG 2014-based projection, and similar to the PG Short term Scenario. This scenario does identify the net out-migration of those in the 15-19 and 25-29 age cohorts, with comparable net in-migration in the 30+ year old cohorts.

 

9.20     Utilising the 2011 Census vacancy, this scenario would, on average provide 497 dwellings per annum within the revised LDP period 2018-2033, with the variant vacancy rate highlighting a provision of 482 dwellings per year. This equates to 7,461 dwellings and 7,236 dwellings over the revised LDP period respectively.

 

9.21     In terms of the link between population change and job creation, this scenario would support the creation of 178 jobs per year, but would fall short of the targets outlined in the Carmarthenshire’s Strategic Regeneration Plan, and only marginally cover the job requirements set out within the Swansea Bay City Deal.

 

Conclusion

9.22     Whilst the delivery of 497 or 482 dwellings per year is similar to that delivered since 2007, it does not offer the flexibility to pick up on those years where housing delivery and the housing market has been more buoyant. Since 2015, housing delivery has been on average 545 dwellings per year and restricting the housing requirement through this scenario as the Preferred Strategy would limit Carmarthenshire’s economic ambitions in terms of job creation and provide opportunities for younger adults within the County to live and work.

This scenario would not deliver the Plan’s Vision and Strategic Objectives.

 

Population Growth Long Term

9.23     Under the PG Long Term scenario, higher net migration flows are estimated (averaging +1,423 people per year), resulting in population change (9.4%) and subsequent dwelling growth of 680 dwellings per year (2011 Census vacancy rate) or 659 dwellings per year (variant vacancy rate). This equates to 10,195 dwellings and 9,887 dwellings over the revised LDP period respectively.

 

9.24     This is higher than estimated under the PG Short Term and WG 2014-based scenarios. Whilst the PG Long Term scenario captures the significantly higher net migration flows over the 2001/02–2007/08 period in its assumptions, the notably lower net migration recorded to 2016/17 has a dampening effect on its migration assumptions.

 

9.25     The age cohort of net migration and population change within this scenario shows much more of a positive outlook. There is a net positive migration in all age cohorts bar the 15-19 years, however there is a decrease in the population change between 25-34 age cohort and 50-59 age cohort. The PG Long Term scenario would provide a more optimistic outlook in seeking to achieve the targets outlined in Carmarthenshire’s Strategic Regeneration Plan with a larger population increase supporting the creation of approximately 353 additional jobs per year.  

 

Conclusion

9.26     On balance, utilising this scenario as the Preferred Strategy would provide a positive outlook and provide an appropriate provision for housing delivery within the county. It would allow the flexibility to drive sustainable housing growth and support the economic ambitions of the county.

 

9.27     Whilst utilising a scenario with higher population growth will see a continuation of people aged 15-19 leaving the county, more return in the 20-24 age cohort which results in a balanced demographic outlook for the county in the future.

 

9.28     Using this scenario would assist in delivering the Plan’s Vision and Strategic Objectives.

 

Population Growth Pre-Recession Scenario

9.29     The PG Pre-Recession scenario is based on internal migration rates and international migration flow assumptions for the period pre-2008 recession (2001/02–2007/08), in which higher in-migration flows to Carmarthenshire were recorded.  Consequently, future estimation of net migration is highest under the PG Pre-Recession scenario.  Utilising the 2011 Census vacancy, this scenario would, on average provide 969 dwellings per annum within the revised LDP period 2018-2033, with the variant vacancy rate highlighting a provision of 939 dwellings per year. This equates to 14,529 dwellings and 14,090 dwellings over the revised LDP period respectively.

 

9.30     Whilst utilising a scenario with higher population growth will see a continuation of people aged 15-19 leaving the county, more return in the 20-24 age cohort which results in a balanced demographic outlook for the county. There would also be a significant population change that would see a 40% increase in the 65+ age cohort, whilst an 82% increase in the 80+ age cohort.

 

9.31     The PG Pre-Recession scenario would provide a positive outlook in seeking to achieve the targets outlined in Carmarthenshire’s Strategic Regeneration Plan and the Swansea Bay City Deal, with a larger population increase supporting the creation of approximately 632 jobs per year.  

 

Conclusion

9.32     Utilising this projection scenario as the revised LDP Preferred Strategy would be commensurate to the growth strategy within the adopted LDP. Whilst this scenario would be ambitious in driving economic aspirations, setting such a high growth requirement through the PG Pre-Recession scenario would result in an undeliverable and unsustainable growth strategy.

 

9.33     This scenario would not deliver the Plan’s Vision and Strategic Objectives.

 

Employment-Led Scenarios

Commuting Ratio Fixed (CR Fixed) and Commuting Ratio Reducing (CR Reducing)

9.34     The Population and Household Forecast Paper identifies two employment-led scenarios as a basis for considering housing growth within the County. The benchmark job requirements comes from the Carmarthenshire Employment Sectoral Study which identifies that to maximise the economic ability of the county, 1,245 jobs per year would need to be created in nine priority sectors[19].

9.35     In meeting the target of 1,245 jobs per year highlighted in the Employment Sectoral Study, population growth within the county would need to be sizable. The population growth within the scenarios CR Fixed and CR Reducing would need to equate to 42,050 and 36,481 persons respectively. In translating this to the number of dwellings required during the revised LDP period, this would equate 1,354 and 1,196 dwellings per year using the 2011 Census vacancy. This would equate to 20,303 and 17,938 dwellings over the revised LDP.

 

9.36     Using the 3.4% vacancy rate, this would equate to CR Fixed scenario highlighting 1,313 dwellings per year, or 19,690 dwellings over the revised LDP period, whilst CR Reducing scenario identifies 1,160 dwellings per year or 17,396 dwellings over the revised LDP period.  

 

Conclusion

9.37     Utilising the employment-led scenarios as the Preferred Strategy for the revised LDP and the high growth requirement set out within it would result in an undeliverable and unsustainable growth strategy for the county. The housing growth requirement set out in the adopted LDP is 1,013 dwellings per year, and one of the reasons to undertake a LDP review was to reconsider this housing requirement as the housing growth targets were not being achieved.

 

9.38     Whilst these scenarios would be ambitious in driving economic aspirations, setting such a high growth requirement would result in an undeliverable and unsustainable growth strategy

 

9.39     This scenario would not deliver the Plan’s Vision and Strategic Objectives

 

Identifying the Preferred Strategic Growth Option

9.40     The identification of the preferred strategic growth option has emerged from the consideration of the above population and household projections, as a consequence of pre-deposit engagement and the need to reach a balanced outcome including other strategies and plans such as, but not limited to:

 

·         Welsh Government - Planning Policy Wales;

·         The Council’s Strategic Regeneration Plan 2015 – 2030 – Transformations;

·         Swansea Bay City Deal;

·         The Council’s New Corporate Strategy 2018 – 2023;

·         The Carmarthenshire Well-being Plan: the Carmarthenshire we want 2018-2033;

·         The Council’s Well-being Objectives;

·         The Council’s Affordable Housing Delivery Plan; and

·         Local Housing Market Assessment[20], and

·         The Council’s Moving Forward in Carmarthenshire: the next 5 years.

 

9.41     It is proposed to use the PG Long Term scenario and utilise the alternative vacancy rate of 3.4% to underpin the future growth requirements for this revised LDP. This scenario projects an overall population increase of 17,567 (9.4%), with the requirement for 9,887 new homes over the revised LDP period 2018-2033. This equates to 659 new homes per year. This scenario will assist in the delivery of the Swansea Bay City Region Deal and the Council’s Corporate Strategy, regeneration and job creation objectives.

 

9.42     Utilising this preferred option would positively progress the Council’s ambitions in delivering affordable homes across the County.

 

9.43     The Preferred Strategy through this growth option will seek to support the delivery of a minimum of 5,295 additional jobs over the Plan period. 

 

Spatial Options

9.44     The following outlines a number of possible Spatial Options which have been identified to inform the selection of our future spatial framework and how future growth may then be distributed across the County for the Plan period. 

 

9.45     The consideration of strategic options is an important part in the preparation of the LDP is a requirement of the SA/SEA process. 

 

9.46     Each spatial option has been subject to engagement to assess and evaluate their appropriateness with a view to establishing or developing a preferred option.  Their content reflects the need to have regard to legislation, national planning policy, local and regional strategies whilst  recognising the specific characteristics, assets and issues which are prevalent in Carmarthenshire and form a strategic approach which delivers on the vision and which promotes and guides development for the County. 

 

9.47     In developing the options regard has also been had to the Well-Being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 and the wellbeing objectives developed by Carmarthenshire County Council and the Public Service Board.

 

9.48     It should be noted that option generation is an important requirement of the SEA directive.  The strategic options have been assessed against the SA/SEA within the Initial Sustainability Appraisal – Strategic Environmental Assessment Report.  This forms an important component in the process of selecting the most suitable strategic option for Carmarthenshire.

 

9.49     The options identified assume that housing development without employment opportunities in the same broad location, and vice versa, is less sustainable and is to be avoided. Similarly, infrastructure improvements need to be aligned with new development, including improvements to transport networks, utilities, green infrastructure, health, education and social facilities. Consequently, the term ‘development’ is used in the Spatial Options for Growth to refer to the balance of housing, employment opportunities and the accompanying infrastructure.

 

9.50     No single option is necessarily considered preferable in their preparation and discussion and there is scope and flexibility for the options to be adapted to take account of additional factors.  It is acknowledged that the preferred option could combine elements from more than one option.

 

 

 

9.51     The tables below provide an explanation of each of the spatial options as considered. This is followed by an identified Preferred Spatial Option for consideration as part of this Preferred Strategy.

Option 1 – Current LDP Option

Description

Utilising the settlement hierarchy to allow for a proportional distribution of development based on sustainability principles

 

Spatial Expression / Settlements Affected

This Option is based on the 4 tier settlement hierarchy.

 

Summary Assessment

This option focusses growth proportionally across a hierarchy underpinned by the principles of sustainability.  In doing so, this option:

·         Encourages the dispersal of employment, housing and other types of development    to identified settlements and village groups or clusters in a manner reflective of their existing scale, population and of the availability of facilities and services.

·         Reflects the diversity of the County and growth is apportioned appropriately to  urban and rural areas.

·         Focusses the majority of employment growth in the larger towns and villages.

 

Positives

·       Reduces the number of journeys and journey distances.

·       Reflects current service provision and the availability of facilities.

·       Benefits social inclusion through access to transport, services and facilities.

·       Proportionate distribution of growth reflecting the current population distribution.

·       Largely consistent with current and emerging national planning policies.

 

Negatives

·      Does not sufficiently take into account market demand.

·      New housing allocations previously apportioned to the second and third tiers of the settlement hierarchy have not delivered in accordance with the Plan’s strategy.

·      Does not fully reflect the role of settlements in their wider context.

·      Places pressure on communities in those areas that have historically taken most development.

·      Does not deliver flexibility and opportunities for small-scale rural development.

 

Conclusions

This option represents a continuation of the existing LDP strategy and as such reference is had to the results of annual monitoring and the review report.  Whilst both indicate successes in the application of the strategy they also identify weaknesses in the delivery of growth in aspects of the settlement hierarchy.

 

It is recognised that elements of the strategy have been successful however, it is also clear that a review and revised approach may be needed to address not only its shortcomings but contextual changes.


 

Option 2 – Infrastructure and Transport Network Option

Description

Basing the majority of growth in the areas in the locality of the main highway and rail network and where there is infrastructure available to support the proposed development.

 

Spatial Expression / Settlements Affected

This Option identifies key settlements and corridors along the main transport routes and areas where there is infrastructure in place or planned to be in place to accommodate the levels of growth required. 

 

Summary Assessment

This option looks at the existing provision of utility infrastructure and the highway network across the County and aims to focus the majority of growth in areas with the capacity for growth.  This option seeks to encourage growth in the areas which it can most feasibly be accommodated by:

 

·         Encouraging growth along the key transport routes and junctions of the M4, A40, A48, A484, A474 and A485 as well as in locations accessible to other modes of transport including the rail network, cycle network and pedestrian linkages.

·         Encouraging growth in areas where there is either current or planned capacity for the supply and treatment of water and waste water. 

·         Encouraging growth in areas where there are sufficient services and facilities to support the communities.

Positives

·      Availability of highway infrastructure

·      The highway network is closely aligned with the main urban areas in the County.

·      Convenient linkages to cross border settlements.

·      Focusses resources and funding to specified hubs and corridors thus enabling development in these areas.

·      Focusses growth in areas well-serviced by transport infrastructure thus delivering a sustainable pattern of growth.

·      Focusses growth in the County’s towns, market towns and larger villages as well as the previously identified growth areas.

·      The availability of infrastructure provides developers with a level of certainty regarding the costs and timescales for delivering allocated sites.

·      This strategy could be responsive to the changing location of healthcare provision in the County by encouraging growth in the locality of new healthcare provision.

·      The availability of infrastructure will require less mitigation in terms of the impacts of development and growth.

Negatives

·        May not meet the housing and employment needs of some communities as the main informant for the strategy would be infrastructure provision and capacity. 

·        Highway capacity issues could restrict the delivery of the strategy at the specified locations.

·        May be driven and restricted by infrastructure investment rather than informing and driving the priorities for investment in infrastructure.

·        May lack flexibility to deal with unforeseen highway and infrastructure capacity issues.

·        Could place pressure on the natural environment, particularly in areas that have historically taken most development.

·        The provision and availability of infrastructure may not align with the needs of the local communities and what the market demands.

·        It may not reflect the principles of sustainability.

·        It does not take account of where housing and employment opportunities are needed.

·          Focus on corridors has little regard for the existing settlement pattern.

·          Does not provide for growth opportunities in rural settlements.

 

Conclusions

This option links growth and the settlement strategy directly to the availability of infrastructure.  Whilst this would restrict the potential for growth in rural areas, it is recognised that the relationship between development and appropriate infrastructure provision is a component necessary as part of any selected option.

 


 

Option 3 – Dispersal Option

Description

No rationale or structure for the distribution of growth; development would be dispersed across the County.

Spatial Expression / Settlements Affected

All settlements could be affected equally under this Option as there is no strategy to identify the distribution of growth.  However, this would be likely to result in levels of growth at a fairly equal level across the County’s settlements.

Summary Assessment

This option distributes housing, employment and other forms of development on a broad basis between settlements within the County, both urban and rural.  It allows settlements to grow incrementally without necessarily taking account of the availability of services or facilities nor the impact which growth could have upon the existing communities and their capacity to accommodate and absorb growth. 

 

Compared to the strategy of the current adopted LDP, this option would see a higher proportion of the County’s growth being directed to the rural areas and a lower proportion to the existing urban areas. 

Positives

·       Relieves development pressures on urban areas by encouraging new development towards villages and rural centres.

·       Growing rural settlements are better able to retain services and facilities.

·       Larger scale residential developments could provide additional opportunities for affordable housing in rural areas.

·       Dispersed growth allows flexibility to respond to area specific constraints by dispersing development across a larger number of locations. 

·       Responds to the development needs of both urban and rural communities.

Negatives

·      Does not take into account the needs of areas.

·      Requires the release of greenfield land.

·      Growth of settlements in sensitive areas could be damaging.

·      Lack of accessibility to public transport would result in an increase in number and length of car journeys.

·      Requires high levels of investment in infrastructure, services and facilities.

·      May contribute to social exclusion due to increased energy and travel costs.

·      Does not take into account market demand

·      Is unlikely to accord with the principles of sustainability and national planning policy. 

·      Could potentially impact upon the character and culture of rural areas.

·      May impact upon service delivery through an unsustainable pattern of development.

Conclusions

This represents a largely unsustainable option and undeliverable option - and one which as a consequence would be unlikely to pass the necessary measures as part of the SA/SEA assessment process.  This option does however through its broad brush approach to distribution of growth focus additional growth in rural areas. 

It is recognised that the chosen preferred option will be required to have appropriate regard to rural considerations.

Option 4 – Community Led Option

Description

Development would be dispersed within community areas in a manner which reflects the role which settlements play within those areas and the wider geographical area.

 

Spatial Expression / Settlements Affected

 

The majority of the growth would be focussed in the following three areas: Carmarthen and surrounding area; Llanelli Coastal Belt; and, Ammanford / Cross Hands area.

 

Summary Assessment

This option focusses on the role of settlements within their wider locality and community which acknowledges the relationships and interdependency between settlements and considers how the local communities work and live.

 

This option will encourage growth in those areas which play a significant role in the wider community; this is most likely to be through the provision of facilities and services rather than the existing scale of the settlement or the existing population numbers.  This option would also seek to reflect the needs of the communities, including their demand for housing.  This acknowledges the individual characteristics of each settlement and seeks to identify the role which settlements play within their locality and on a county-wide basis. 

 

This option should reflect an understanding of the needs of local communities and focus growth in areas where it is needed to support communities and their aspirations for future growth and ongoing sustainability of facilities and services.  This is likely to result in the allocation of smaller sites and a higher proportion of growth being directed to smaller settlements. 

Positives

·      Provides a balance between the contrasting urban and rural areas of the county which reflects the principles of sustainability.

·      Apportioned growth would reflect the role which settlements play within their communities.

·      Supports the ongoing use of community facilities and services in both rural and urban areas.

·      Provides the potential to support the retention of younger people within the settlement.

·      Could result in greater investment opportunities in the rural areas.

·      Could allow for a flexible approach to small-scale growth in rural communities.

·      Provides the potential to apportion growth in a manner which acknowledges and respects the characteristics of settlements.

·      May contribute to social inclusion in rural areas through encouraging growth and investment in services and facilities, whilst reflecting, and where appropriate, enforcing the role of existing urban centres.

Negatives

·     Could result in development in environmentally unsustainable locations.

·     Could result in disproportionate growth in rural areas.

·     Development in rural areas could generate significant car journeys which would be contrary to the principles of sustainability.

·     It is unclear whether growth allocated to some settlements within rural areas, particularly the market towns, would materialise given that limited growth has successfully occurred within these areas in the past; this could compromise the delivery of the Plan.

           

Conclusions

This option seeks to be more responsive to individual aspects of the County and their communities.  Whilst the perceived focus of growth would be in established centres it affords opportunity to reflect a wider distribution. 

Feedback indicates that the option would need to be appropriately balanced to ensure growth is distributed in an appropriate and deliverable manner.

 


 

Option 5 – Swansea Bay City Region Influence Option

Description

Focusses growth to align with the areas identified for Swansea Bay City Deal projects.

 

Spatial Expression / Settlements Affected

The majority of the growth would be focussed in the Llanelli and Carmarthen areas with those adjoining and adjacent areas also receiving a proportion of the growth.

 

Summary Assessment

This option is focussed on the projects and investment planned as part of the Swansea Bay City Deal and channels growth to align with these geographical areas.  The projects proposed for Carmarthenshire are:

 

·         The Life Science and Well-being Village, Llanelli.  This facility is a village providing facilities and services which promote and improve well-being.  It is proposed to be a multi-faceted facility integrating business development, education, healthcare, leisure, tourism, wellness support and research in life-sciences in one location; and,

·         Yr Egin, Carmarthen.  This facility would be a new creative, digital and media hub to be based at the University of Wales Trinity St David

 

This Option is likely to see the majority of growth being focussed in Carmarthen and Llanelli and the surrounding areas, however, the settlements further away from Carmarthen and Llanelli may potentially see very little growth.  It may provide opportunities for spin-off investments and entrepreneurship based activities by building on the City Deal priorities.

Positives

·      Likely to result in significant job creation.

·      The commitment already given to significant investment in these projects would improve the Option’s deliverability.

·      Development would build on, and benefit from, significant investment and resources focussed to facilitate the delivery of the Swansea Bay City Deal.

·      Future employment opportunities and residential development would be well aligned which should contribute to a more sustainable pattern of development.

·      Would allow for continued regard for the existing settlement pattern.

Negatives

·      Potentially limited growth focussed to the north of the county.

·      Constrains development outside urban centres.

·      Increases the potential for the over development of urban areas resulting in concentration and ‘town cramming’.

·      Development needs may result in pressures on urban green spaces.

·      Places additional pressures on urban public services.

·      Would restrict proposals within rural areas with potential impacts on local service provision and population level.

·      The areas furthest away from the project areas will be likely to depend upon broadband provision and speed in order to benefit from the investment in these areas.

Conclusions

This option embraces, and is driven by the opportunities presented through the City Deal.  It focuses on the locations of the 2 main projects within Carmarthenshire and as such would be less inclusive of the remainder of the County.

It should however be recognised that reflecting the potential of the City Deal to effect real change is essential in any preferred option.

 


 

Option 6 – Market Led Option

Description

Focusses growth in the areas which have proven most popular with the housing market over recent years.

 

Spatial Expression / Settlements Affected

Growth would be focussed in the top tier of the adopted LDP’s settlement hierarchy comprising Carmarthen, Llanelli and Ammanford / Cross Hands areas.

 

Summary Assessment

This option will aim to meet the aspirations and requirements of the development industry by identifying sites and areas which are the most economically attractive to develop. This option looks at the market success of settlements within the County since 2008 and apportions growth in accordance with past delivery rates.   

 

The past delivery rates indicate that the majority of growth took place in the Llanelli area with a significant amount of development also being directed to the Carmarthen growth area and parts of the Ammanford/Cross Hands growth area. 

 

This approach could be construed as ‘planning based on numbers’.  It would seek to direct growth in accordance with the highest delivery rates of the past and apply this trend to identify the location for future development.  Future employment provision would reflect current take-up of employment land and would relate closely to the distribution of housing.

Positives

·       A focus on delivery by market forces with minimal public sector involvement.

·       New developments would be well related to the existing transport infrastructure and existing services and facilities.

·       Likely to allow for financial viability and profitability.

·       Provides homes in the areas which are popular with the majority and therefore would perform well in regards to the supply and demand of housing.

Negatives

·          Given the proximity and accessibility of the Llanelli area to the County’s boundary with Swansea County, this option could increase the supply of housing to meet demands from outside the plan area.

·          Subject to market trends and influenced by economic boom and recession.

·          This Option focusses growth in existing urban settlements and would be less likely to recognise the role of rural areas.

·          Could contribute to congestion along the highway network in the areas identified for a higher proportion of growth, particularly in the Llanelli area.

·          May not be sufficiently flexible to respond to changes in market demand, particularly in response to changes in the preferred locations.

·          The spatial option would be informed by past build rates however this may not be a true reflection of what the market demands given that there could be a desire to build and live in other locations but other constraints and financial viability may impede the delivery of sites at these locations.

·          Places pressure on communities in those areas that have historically taken most development.

·          Places pressures on greenspaces in the areas identified to accommodate the majority of growth.

 

Conclusions

This option through its focus on the market would, whilst deliverable in a simplistic interpretation, be vulnerable to other considerations and constraints and would remove substantively any local influence.  It is not considered a deliverable option in practicable terms but points clearly to the role of the market and development industry in contributing to a sound and deliverable plan.

The role of the market will inevitably be a contributing to the development of the preferred option. 

 

 

Identifying the Preferred Spatial Option

9.52     The development of the preferred option has emerged from the consideration of the spatial options and other considerations, including but not limited to:

 

·         the well-being objectives;

·         the content of the Annual Monitoring Reports and Review Report; and,

·          the engagement processes notably through the Key Stakeholder Forum.

 

9.53     In developing the preferred option, there was always an acceptance that there would be potential variations on the strategic options identified, including an option which would consider a mix of the positive outcomes from a number of those options. In considering the above, and having reference to the Issues, Objectives and Vision discussed earlier in the Preferred Strategy, a hybrid option emerged as the most appropriate approach in delivering a balanced and sustainable spatial strategy for all the communities across the County.

 

The following hybrid option has consequently emerged which reflects a number of characteristics from the identified options above. This emergence is in part, built from comments received as part of the engagement process.


 

Preferred Option - Balanced Community and Sustainable Growth Strategy.

9.54     This hybrid option builds on the approach highlighted through Strategic Option 4 - Community Led, but removes the prescriptive approach in assigning character areas within the County.  The strategy will however retain an approach which reflects the role and function of settlements and will seek to be responsive in how it assigns growth, to urban and rural areas of the County.

·                The option will recognise and reflect investment and economic benefits to the County and its communities through the City Deal, and other economic opportunities.

·                It will seek to provide opportunities for rural areas ensuring the diversity of the County and communities is recognised;

·                It will acknowledge that in delivering sustainable growth that it needs to be supported by the availability of a range of appropriate infrastructure;

·                It will recognise that growth should be deliverable and orientated to a community’s needs and market demand.


10.       A New Strategy

10.1     The Strategy sets out to deliver the vision and strategic objectives and addressing the key issues identified within this Preferred Strategy.  The Revised LDP will, as it progresses through to adoption, set out how the changes within Carmarthenshire over the Plan period will be managed and planned for. Through its policies and proposals, the Revised LDP will seek to provide for these changes and the respective levels of growth, and identify where such growth will be acceptable. This is achieved through identifying sites for specific land uses whilst protecting and enhancing the County’s rich environmental, landscape and built historic interests.  These detailed elements will be contained within the Deposit LDP. 

 

10.2     The preparation of this Preferred Strategy has been informed by national and regional guidance with plans and strategies at all levels contributing, where appropriate to the development of an emerging evidence and knowledge base. Engagement has also played a central role in preparing this Preferred Strategy (including issues generation and the strategic options).

 

A New Spatial Approach

10.3     The Revised Carmarthenshire Local Development Plan 2018 – 2033 recognises the diversity that exists within the County and the need to reflect this in its strategic approach.  The Spatial Strategy identifies a settlement hierarchy but sets it within a settlement framework grouped under six clusters.  These, and the distribution of growth, will focus on sustainable principles but will also recognise the respective role, function and contribution of settlements within particular clusters, whilst recognising and protecting and enhancing those valued aspects and environments.

 

10.4     Each cluster will reflect the diversity that exists between them and their respective settlements. Growth will be distributed accordingly to identified centres whilst recognising the integral role of local growth and diversification to delivering for Carmarthenshire.

 

10.5     The strategic growth areas reflect the current urban form in the shape of Llanelli, Ammanford/Cross Hands and Carmarthen with their respective sustainability credentials and strong economic drivers from a market demand and delivery perspective.  These three form part of the six clusters and whilst they will receive an appropriate proportion of the anticipated growth, there will be a balanced approach to distribution.

 

10.6     Other areas will include a focus on Local Growth and Diversification.  These areas are those where growth will reflect the community, whilst understanding those wider delivery expectations associated with Plan making (e.g. national policy and guidance).  Often incorporating areas which are more rural in character such areas play an integral role not only for the everyday life of their communities but are essential to a vibrant and thriving Carmarthenshire. 

 

10.7     Regeneration and job creation are important components across the County. Allocated sites and the use of policies will provide a framework for the provision of employment and job creation opportunities.  This will seek to provide a positive approach to help these areas meet their full potential and build on the opportunities within all of Carmarthenshire’s communities. The Strategy is therefore firmly rooted within the “One Carmarthenshire” ethos as set out within the Vision.

 

10.8     The Plan will use allocations and development limits where appropriate, as well as using policies and criteria to ensure that the right development is in the right place, in addition to preventing unacceptable developments within Carmarthenshire’s communities.

 

10.9     Across the Plan area there will be commonality of policies, however there may be specific variations to allow for a responsive policy approach. 

 

Deliverable Growth

10.10   The new strategy seeks to provide balanced growth centred on the delivery of our communities’ needs and the delivery of the region and the Council’s strategic and regeneration objectives. 

 

10.11   This LDP will provide the opportunity to deliver 9,887 homes over the Plan period. This is the equivalent of 659 homes per year from 2018 to 2033.  This would allow for new homes to be provided in a sustainable manner which supports the aspirations of our communities and provides appropriate flexibility to respond to the Council’s affordable housing objectives.  This ambitious agenda for Carmarthenshire will allow the Plan to build upon the approximately 500 homes being provided per year under the current adopted LDP. 

 

10.12   The new strategy ensures that sufficient opportunity exists to maximise affordable provision to support both rural and urban housing needs, whilst providing a strong basis for the provision of a deliverable market housing provision. 

10.13   The new strategy provides an opportunity to balance the demographics of the County through the retention of, and migration of younger adults into the County, and address some of the issues which could be perceived from an aging population.

 

10.14   Such an approach will be supported through a strong economic environment with the delivery of a minimum of 5,295 jobs over the Plan period an important component.  This reflects the growth and job creation objectives within the Council’s Regeneration Strategy, and through the Swansea Bay City Region Deal.

 

10.15   Furthermore, supporting a positive approach to growth within Carmarthenshire will provide the younger demographic a further opportunity to live and work within the County. 

 

10.16   In delivering the number of homes set above, this Preferred Strategy includes an additional flexibility as part of its supply (uplift) to ensure the delivery of sustainable growth and to overcome any potential unforeseen deliverability issues.  A 6% flexibility through a further 593 homes, is included.  This equates to a housing supply of 10,480 dwellings to deliver the 9,887 homes.

 

Sustainable Development, Well-being and Climate Change

10.17   In planning for a sustainable future for Carmarthenshire, this Preferred Strategy seeks to reflect and promote the principles of Sustainable Development (SD) and to embed the duties set through the Well-being of Future Generations Act 2015.  The planning system has a long standing track record in the promotion of SD and in this respect this Preferred Strategy and the LDP as it progresses through to adoption will seek to enhance the economic, social and environmental well-being of communities. It will also as part of this agenda play its part in tackling the causes and effects of climate change reflecting the contribution of the planning system as a whole.

 

10.18   The LDP seek to put a policy framework in place which tackles the causes and effects of climate change within our communities through the adoption of sustainable principles and development.

 

10.19   The LDP will promote the principles of sustainability by:

·            Protecting and enhancing biodiversity, townscapes and landscapes;

·            Minimising energy demand and consumption by facilitating the delivery of carbon neutral buildings and homes, including the promotion of the efficient use of resources including directing development to previously developed land wherever possible;

·            Distributing and locating development in accordance with the settlement framework with a view to reducing unwarranted reliance of the private motor car.  It will promote sustainable and ‘green’ travel alternatives building on advances in technology and promotes accessibility to alternative means of travel;

·            The promotion of sustainable waste management;

·            The promotion of sustainable water management (including ensuring a sustainable supply of water resources and water quality, promoting sustainable drainage modes and addressing flooding issues). This includes reducing the vulnerability of communities by ensuring that development is not located in flood risk areas;

·            Promote the enhancement of wellbeing and social inclusion by supporting healthy, accessible and cohesive communities;

·            Supporting the development of a resilient economy and facilitating appropriate future growth; and,

·            The promoting and safeguarding the Welsh language and culture.

A New Strategy - Key Components

10.20   The key components of the strategy are as follows:

·            Provide for 10,480 new homes to deliver a household requirement of 9,887 homes;

·            Provide opportunities to deliver a minimum of 5,295 new jobs in the County in supporting the Regeneration and strategic economic and employment ambitions within the County and region;

·            Provide sufficient employment land to support economic growth and job creation;

·            Promotes a settlement framework which supports cohesion between settlements and communities;

·            Distribute development in accordance with the settlement hierarchy, reflecting the sustainability and functional attributes of settlements, their services and facilities as well as their ability to accommodate growth;

·            To respect and enhance the rich and diverse environmental qualities of the County;

·            To reflect the needs of rural areas and the rural economy;

·            Recognise the cultural and linguistic character of the County;

·            Contribute to the delivery of physical and social regeneration opportunities and provides for a diverse and cohesive range of settlements and communities;

·            Reflect the diversity across the County, and within its settlements and communities;

·            Provide for employment both through allocated sites and through policy provisions across the County recognising the need to sustain and enhance rural economies;

·            Focus retail change in established centres whilst providing opportunities for provision throughout the hierarchy in a way which will assist in improving accessibility to services and facilities and help in achieving viable, self-supporting settlements and sustainable communities;

·            Recognise the contribution of ‘previously developed land’ and utilises it as appropriate whilst recognising the County’s largely rural context;

·            To provide opportunities to cater for the County’s visitor economy;

·            Protect and enhances the natural, historic and built conservation qualities of Carmarthenshire and its high value landscapes; and,

·           Contribute to an integrated transport network both within the County and region. Seeks to make efficient use of the existing road and rail network by reflecting that the public transport network can afford the opportunity for consolidation and improvement of service thus maintaining and improving accessibility. Promote opportunities to use and access alternative means of transport including walking and cycling.

 

(Insert key Diagram)


 

11.       Strategic Policies

 

11.1     The following sections set out the Strategic Policies which form the framework for implementing and delivering the LDP.  The format and structure reflects the core elements of sustainability and sustainable development, and the four well-being objectives or themes as identified within the Carmarthenshire Well-being Plan.  This allows the Strategic Policies to cross reference to the strategic objectives set out in this document as well as the relevant Well-being goals. The strategic policies will therefore be set within the following themes:

·         Early Intervention - To make sure that people have the right help at the right time; as and when they need it

 

·         Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

·         Healthy Habits - People have a good quality of life, and make healthy choices about their lives and environment.

 

·         Strong Connections - Strongly connected people, places and organisations that are able to adapt to change

Early Intervention - To make sure that people have the right help at the right time; as and when they need it
11.2     It is recognised that there will be some overlap between the respective themes and the policies and as such they should be read in conjunction with one another.  Each strategic policy is accompanied by an explanatory text.

11.3     The implications for the well-being of individuals, their families and communities is recognised within this Preferred Strategy through a focus on creating sustainable and inclusive places. This as part of a connected approach across all the themes allows long term solutions to ensure opportunities are available to maintain and enhance well-being.

 

11.4     It recognises that sustainable places are created from a balance of environmentally friendly, economically vibrant, and socially inclusive characteristics, that aim to benefit not only current inhabitants but also future generations. 

 

11.5     Whilst it is recognised that there is an overlap between the themes and the assignment of policies the following having been identified under this theme:

·       Strategic Policy – SP 1:Strategic Growth

·       Strategic Policy – SP 2: Retail and Town Centres

 

11.6     It should be noted that specific policies will be developed as part of the Deposit LDP and will as appropriate be identified within the context of the relevant theme.

 

Strategic Policy – SP 1: Strategic Growth 
 The LDP will provide for the future growth of the economy and housing requirement through the provision of following: 
 
 a) 10,480 new homes to meet the identified housing requirement of 9,887.
 b) A minimum of 5,295 new jobs
 
 The focus on regeneration and growth reflects the Councils core strategic ambitions with development distributed in a sustainable manner consistent with the spatial strategy and settlement hierarchy.

11.7     The following policies seek to support the delivery of the Plan’s strategic objectives, but also provide high level links and broad conformity with the Well-Being Goals.

11.8     This Preferred Strategy puts at its heart the creation of a balanced and cohesive County. It recognises that to deliver this the County’s role as a strong and economic driver for growth both locally and regionally, and that this places Carmarthenshire at the centre of a prosperous and sustainable Wales.

 

11.9     The strategy builds on the corporate emphasis on regeneration and the opportunities presented through the City Deal, whilst also recognising the opportunities presented through the rural economy and diverse needs of communities across the County. The strategy therefore, whilst not entirely employment led, has a strong recognition of the role employment plays in creating a prosperous County - with appropriate growth of housing with jobs and employment opportunities.

 

11.10   The Council, as part of its corporate policy, placed regeneration as its number one objective. This is reflected through:

 

·         The Swansea Bay City Deal;

·         Transformations – Carmarthenshire Regeneration Plan; and

·         Moving Forward in Carmarthenshire: The Council’s New Corporate Strategy 2018 – 2033.

 

11.11   This focus on job creation and investment is based on Carmarthenshire’s strategic location and its regional economic role.  This draft preferred strategy therefore seeks to recognise and reflect this, and the corporate objectives, in supporting and creating an attractive place to workers and investors.

 

11.12   The level of job growth and its relationship to the housing requirement in the Plan is recognised in developing this Draft Preferred Strategy.  Ensuring that our housing growth requirements are reflective of, and in support of, our economic ambitions allows for a co-ordinated and integrated approach ensuring that the shared role that economic growth is not in isolation of housing and vice a versa. 

 

11.13   This approach requires the development of a balanced set of population and household projections that challenge the Welsh Government 2014-based projections. This is to ensure there is a sufficient supply of homes to support the delivery of our economic ambitions and the needs of our communities.

 

11.14   The population and household trends, set through the Welsh Government’s 2014-based projections, have been derived from demographic patterns during a recessionary period.  We feel that they do not reflect the positive ambitions of the County and the region over the plan period (or the rates of housing completions over the preceding years). This draft strategy and its growth levels are intended to be ambitious but deliverable, and reflect wider objectives than this LDP alone.

 

11.15   This draft Preferred Strategy will seek to distribute growth through a sustainable settlement hierarchy derived from the preferred spatial option.  This recognises the role Carmarthenshire’s rural areas as well as urban and their contribution in delivering this strategy and its vision for ‘One Carmarthenshire’.

 

11.16   We will work closely with partners, infrastructure providers, developers and investors, and communities in delivering the LDP, its strategy, policies and proposals.


 

Strategic Policy – SP 2: Retail and Town Centres
 Proposals for retail development will be considered in accordance with the following retail hierarchy.
 Proposals will be permitted where they maintain and enhance the vibrancy, viability and attractiveness of our retail centres. They should protect and promote the viability and vitality of the defined retail centres, supporting the appropriate delivery of retail provision (comparison and convenience), leisure, entertainment, office and cultural facilities. 
 Proposals for small local convenience shopping facilities in rural and urban areas where they accord with the settlement framework will be supported. 
 11.17   Retail provision within the County as identified through the retail hierarchy below reflects the role such centres play in providing essential goods and services which are readily accessible to residents, preferably by a choice of means of transport, whilst also providing the opportunity to access a wide range of other, non-essential goods and services within reasonable distances.

 

11.18   This recognises the general pattern of provision in a traditional hierarchy of centres ranging from the small localised provision through to the larger centres and providing a greater choice over a wider product range. The larger centres also act as locations for related activities in the leisure and entertainment sphere including cinemas and restaurants etc. and for commercial office uses including solicitors, accountants and estate agents etc.

 

11.19   In general, local provision represents goods and services required on a day-to-day basis (convenience items) and for which residents may make short journeys frequently, whilst the larger centres not only provide such facilities but also more specialised items (comparison goods) sought less frequently and for which shoppers are prepared to travel further. Traditionally, shopping provision has evolved in a hierarchy of centres with overlapping catchments reflecting their size and importance.

 

11.20   It is this pattern of retail provision which characterises Carmarthenshire with the larger centres of Carmarthen, Llanelli and Ammanford serving extensive catchment areas with a broad and specialised range of goods and items. The smaller towns or market towns of, for example, Newcastle Emlyn, Llandeilo and St Clears with their smaller more localised catchments typically meet local needs with some specialised provision.  This is supplemented by often larger villages which may provide essential items required to meet day to day needs.

 

11.21   As in many areas out-of-centre shopping with large retail warehouses (including bulky goods) has participated in changing retail trends and have in certain instances challenged the vibrancy and role of existing and established town centres.  Whilst these challenges are recognised it is also noted that they can present opportunities in broadening the retail offer.

 

11.22   The retail strategy of the LDP reflects the social, economic and environmental principles of sustainable development which underpins the Plan. It also seeks to reflect the changing nature of retailing and the need for traditional town centres to adapt to such changes.  The Strategy seeks to:

a.   Protect and enhance the roles of the principal centres of Carmarthen, Llanelli and Ammanford in serving wide catchment areas for comparison shopping (clothing, footwear, electrical etc.) and specialised items to ensure their continued attractiveness as town centre and shopping destinations.  The challenge will be to maintain their competitiveness and market share whilst understanding the needs of each centre and their respective role and contribution in retail terms;

b.   In other, smaller centres, ensure that local communities have reasonable access to a satisfactory range of high street facilities and services particularly convenience goods (food and other essential day-to-day requirements); and,

c.   In the larger villages, maintain the viability of the village shop and other local facilities.

 

11.23   The Updated Retail Study (2015) for Carmarthenshire examined retail issues across the County and assessed the capacity for growth across the retail sectors and was prepared to provide evidence in respect of policy formulation and in guiding decision making

 

11.24   PPW requires us to identify a retail hierarchy for the Plan area. Consequently, the “town centres first” principle in tandem with a sequential approach to the selection of sites will be used to promote town centres as the principal locations for new retail, office, leisure and health facilities. In doing so the aim will be to create more reasons why people should visit such centres with a resultant increase in social and economic activity thereby retaining its viability. The Retail Hierarchy is set out in the table below and comprises three tiers. The upper tier comprises the traditional Town Centres where there is a recognisable town centre and a wide range of uses such as retail, leisure, office, cultural and transport facilities. The middle tier comprises of a number of those settlements classified as Service Centres.  Such centres include smaller retail centres and distinct groupings of retail and other uses.  The Deposit LDP will identify town centres in both these tiers with further specific policies in respect of retail activity within the Principal Centres. The lowest tier is that of Local Centres which range from small shopping parades in often largely residential areas to loose clusters of retail and other uses in settlement or village centres.

 

Principal Centres:

Carmarthen

Llanelli

Ammanford

Service Centres:

Burry Port

Llandeilo

Llandovery

Newcastle Emlyn

St Clears

Whitland

Local Provision (Service Centres):

Llanybydder

Kidwelly

Glanamman/Garnant

Trimsaran

Pontyberem

Pontyates

Brynamman

Laugharne

Llangadog

Ferryside

Hendy

 

11.25   The Plan recognises that certain types of retail and leisure facilities cannot be suitably accommodated within town centre locations and that Regional Centres (Retail Parks) can play a role in accommodating this need. However, the sequential approach should be adopted which means that first preference should be for existing town centre locations as listed in the retail hierarchy, and then for sites immediately adjoining town centres. If there are no suitable available sites in these locations, only then may development in the following existing regional centres (retail parks) be considered.  This approach reflects the guidance set out within TAN4 Retail and Commercial Development which also states that ‘Out of centre retail parks whose development has been based solely on retailing should not normally be included in the local hierarchy:

11.26   Regional Centres: (Retail Parks)

·         Stephens Way, Carmarthen;

·         Parc Pensarn, Carmarthen;

·         Parc Trostre;

·         Parc Pemberton, Llanelli;

·         Cross Hands Retail Park.

 

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.
11.27   We recognise that the role of town centres and traditional retail patterns is changing, as such both town centre and primary and secondary retail boundaries as identified previously will be reviewed and where appropriate revised.  This recognition of the changing retail pattern and the potential for flexibility in maintaining occupancy and footfall, as part of the creation of vibrant and living environments.

11.28   The recognition of the issues (including poverty and deprivation) facing both rural and urban parts of our County within this Preferred Strategy is implicit as part of its “One Carmarthenshire” ethos. To this end, this Preferred Strategy seeks to tackle these issues by maximising opportunities for everyone to maintain and/or increase their sense of wellbeing.

 

11.29   These opportunities include the provision for new homes (including affordable homes) and jobs, as well as steering new investment and infrastructural priorities – whilst also respecting the County’s social fabric (including the Welsh language) and its sense of place.

 

11.30   Whilst it is recognised that there is an overlap between the themes and the assignment of policies the following having been identified under this theme:

 

·         Strategic Policy – SP 4: Affordable Homes

·         Strategic Policy – SP 5: Strategic Sites

·         Strategic Policy – SP 6:Employment and the Economy

·         Strategic Policy – SP 7: Welsh Language and Culture

·         Strategic Policy – SP 8:Infrastructure

·         Strategic Policy – SP 9: Gypsy and Traveller Provision

·         Strategic Policy – SP 10: The Visitor Economy

·         Strategic Policy – SP 11: Placemaking, Sustainability and High Quality Design

 

11.31   It should be noted that specific policies will be developed as part of the Deposit LDP and will as appropriate be identified within the context of the relevant theme.

 

11.32   The following policies seek to support the delivery of the Plan’s strategic objectives, but also provide high level links and broad conformity with the Well-Being Goals.

 

Strategic Policy – SP 3: Providing New Homes 
 In order to ensure the overall housing requirement of 9,887 homes for the plan period 2018-2033 is met, provision is made for 10,480 new homes in accordance with the settlement framework. 
 11.33   It is a fundamental aim of the Plan to facilitate the delivery of the required number and range of quality new homes, which will meet the identified housing needs of our future generations.

 

11.34   The housing requirement figure for the County is based on the Population Growth (PG) - Long Term projections scenario. This scenario projects a housing requirement which would support the economic ambitions of the County through supporting job creation, and re-address the imbalance of an ageing population within Carmarthenshire. The rationale for using this preferred growth option also considers the past build rates within the County over the previous 10 years and allows an ambitious, yet sound basis, on which to deliver the Council’s overall strategic aims.

 

11.35   This Draft Preferred Strategy factors in a number of various contributors to meet this housing need, together with a flexibility (uplift) to ensure that the overall aim of the strategic policy to provide new homes is met. The housing supply is made up of the following elements: [21]

 

Housing Allocations (over 5 homes)                                       xxxxxx

Windfall and Regeneration Allowance                                    xxxxxx

Small Site Component (less than 5 homes)                           xxxxxx

Windfall Component (5+ Homes)                                           xxxxxx

Flexibility (6%)                                                                                    xxxxxx

 

Housing Allocations

11.36   A key source in meeting the identified housing land requirement is through sites allocated for residential development within the LDP. These housing allocations will be identified within the specific housing policies, or included as part of mixed use allocations.

 

11.37   The specific policies will consider the developments which have been commenced / committed since the base date of the revised LDP, and they will be monitored through the work undertaken as part of the Joint Housing Land Availability (JHLA) Study.

 

Windfall

11.38   The windfall allowance is made up of the below two factors:

 

·         The first relates to the potential contributions of sites of less than five dwellings (small sites) within the defined settlements.

 

·        

Strategic Policy – SP 4: Affordable Homes
 The Plan will maximise the delivery of affordable homes up to 2033 through the provision of XXXX affordable homes.22

Secondly, there will be a windfall allowance through sites of five or more dwellings which have traditionally made an important contribution to housing delivery within Carmarthenshire. Existing windfall sites which make a contribution in the adopted LDP may be considered as housing allocations within the revised LDP, provided that the homes are completed after the base date of the revised LDP, and that evidence is provided to show its potential deliverability.

11.39   Affordable housing represents a key issue to be considered in the preparation of the Revised LDP particularly in contributing to the development of sustainable and balanced communities.

 

11.40   This policy seeks to reflect the requirements set out in TAN 2 – Planning and Affordable Housing which seeks to put mechanisms in place to ensure that affordable housing is accessible to those who cannot afford market housing, both on first occupation and for subsequent occupiers.

 

11.41   In assessing the need for affordable dwellings appropriate regard will be had to the most up to date Carmarthenshire Local Housing Market Assessment (LHMA).  However, whilst the LHMA identifies the level of housing need, it is not expected that the planning system alone will, or should provide for this shortfall.

 

11.42   The Plan will also take into account the Council’s Affordable Housing Delivery Plan 2016-2020 which sets out a five year vision for delivering affordable housing, with the initial programme set to deliver over 1,000 additional affordable homes over its five year period. The revised LDP and the planning system will make a significant contribution to this target through various affordable housing mechanisms, in addition to mechanisms through other policies and strategies. The LDP can support the aims of achieving this target through:

 

·           On-site provision of affordable housing as a percentage of the overall development, or on sites acquired by social housing providers;

·           Commuted sum contributions to support the delivery of affordable housing; and

·           Local Need housing.

 

Strategic Policy – SP 5: Strategic Sites
 In reflecting their contribution to the future growth requirements for Carmarthenshire and as key components of the Swansea Bay City deal, two Strategic Sites have been identified as making an important contribution to the overall provision for growth during the Plan period: 
 
 • The Llanelli Life Science and Well-being Village; and 
 • Yr Egin – Creative Digital Cluster

11.43   The location of affordable homes should be related to identified need and be in accordance with the Plan’s Spatial Strategy. Proposals should address locational considerations including safe and convenient accessibility to open space, education, employment and other services.

 

Llanelli Life Science and Well-being Village

11.44   The Life Science and Well-being Village will create a physical village providing facilities and services which promote and improve well-being, integrate business development, education, healthcare, leisure, tourism, wellness support and research in life-sciences in one location and deliver transformational social and economic benefits.

 

11.45   The village will include an institute of life science providing space for research and development into new medical devices and healthcare technologies. The institute will also offer large office, laboratory and clinical space for growing and new regional companies as well as opportunities for business start-ups.

 

11.46   There will be a wellness hub which will include a leisure centre, outdoor sports facilities, recreation opportunities and well-being promotion activities. There will be assisted living, a care home and dedicated housing for people with cognitive impairment or in medical rehabilitation.

 

11.47   There will be a life science and well-being centre where a range of wellness services from health, public, private and third sectors will be available in one location. The centre will also include training opportunities which will be developed to meet skills shortages. There will be relaxation opportunities to improve wellness[22]

 

11.48   This ‘world class’ village will be situated along the Llanelli coastline. It will be the largest ever regeneration project in South West Wales, and aims to improve the health and wellbeing of people across the region, creating up to 2000 high quality, well paid jobs and boosting the economy by a staggering £467 million over 15 years. It will be interlinked and integrated within the natural landscape, set around a freshwater lake and located within walking distance of the Millennium Coastal Park.[23]

 

11.49   The outstanding coastal setting in post-industrial South Llanelli is testimony to a long standing track record regeneration initiatives by the Council and its partners, including Welsh Government.

 

11.50   In noting the strategic context, this project remains firmly rooted in the promotion of wellness at a local level. The opportunity to increase in wellbeing within those current and future generations residing in the nearby communities, as well enable the delivery of a renowned physical development, are fully in keeping with the Strategy of the Revised LDP.

 

Yr Egin – Creative Digital Cluster

11.51   The Egin project will create a new digital and creative cluster in Carmarthen, provide start up and development space for creative and digital companies and promote the Welsh Language.

 

11.52   The project will build a new creative, digital and media hub on the University of Wales Trinity Saint David’s (UWTSD) Campus in Carmarthen. It will be the base for the Welsh language broadcaster S4C and will provide start up and development space for creative and digital companies.

 

11.53   The facility will create a cluster of businesses in the creative and digital industry, encouraging collaboration, providing common facilities and generating opportunities for shared learning.

 

11.54   By taking advantage of the new infrastructure proposals of the Internet Coast, Yr Egin will create major and positive change in the creative and digital economy of Wales.[24]

 

11.55   The opportunities afforded by this project are many and varied. In spatial terms, it is envisaged that it will re affirm the role of Carmarthen as a key hub on the gateway to West Wales and a focal point for those rural communities to the north.

 

 

Strategic Policy – SP 6: Employment and the Economy
 Sufficient and appropriate land will be allocated for the provision of employment opportunities for the Plan period (figure to be quantified) in accordance with the Plan’s Spatial Strategy / Settlement Framework.

11.56   The future development of employment sites, and indeed the future economic development of the County, should be viewed in the wider context. The Swansea Bay City Deal was signed in 2017, securing £1.3 billion for Swansea, Carmarthenshire, Neath Port Talbot and Pembrokeshire councils.  It is anticipated that the Deal will transform the economic landscape of the area, boost the local economy by £1.8billion, and generate almost 10,000 new jobs over the next 15 years. 

 

11.57   The Deal will see three specific projects for Carmarthenshire – a Wellness and Life Science Village at Delta Lakes, Llanelli; a creative industry project at Yr Egin in Carmarthen; and a skills and talent initiative which will support skills development. 

 

11.58   The Council commissioned an Employment Sectoral Study (ESS) in 2016, the focus of which, in respect of the LDP, was on providing an understanding of future employment need in respect of the nine priority sectors identified by the Welsh Government.  In so doing the study sought to review employment land provision and job figures and to subsequently provide a figure for the amount of employment land that would be required for the Revised LDP period.

 

11.59   The ESS calculated that up to 127ha of employment land would be required to be delivered in Carmarthenshire by 2032 in order to accommodate the forecasted employment need of 18,681 new jobs.  The database (and forecasting model) for the ESS was developed with the functionality to test a number of different scenarios.  Subsequent work on population growth models undertaken as part of the spatial strategy for the Revised LDP estimates that a smaller number of new jobs would be required over the Plan period and that consequently less land needed for employment purposes. 

 

11.60   So whilst the 127ha figure is therefore aspirational, it nevertheless recognises that the distribution of employment opportunities throughout the County is crucial in supporting the aims and objectives of the economic aspirations of the County as set out within Transformations – a Strategic Regeneration Plan for Carmarthenshire 2015-2030

 

11.61   Whilst the Study emphasises the new strategic focus associated with the new Swansea Bay City Deal, new sites located outside of the highest tiers of the hierarchy can make a significant contribution to the settlements and communities they serve, especially in rural areas where opportunities for new businesses to establish or existing businesses to expand would be severely constrained in the absence of appropriate sites and premises.

 

11.62   With respect to sectoral employment, the sectors identified are the nine ‘priority sectors’ identified by the Welsh Government.  However, as well as the headline numbers of jobs in each sector, it is also important to acknowledge that certain sectors will be generating significant number of ‘valued added’ jobs in the priority sectors. This is particularly the case for the estimated 2,500 Life Science jobs as these are likely to generate significant amounts of additional economic wealth locally compared to jobs in more traditional sectors such as construction.

 

11.63   In order to meet this potential, a range and choice of sites would be required, with a larger proportion of land being allocated in the larger centres, but also extending into rural areas in order to sustain these areas through helping to create self-supporting and viable communities and settlements.

 

11.64   Consequently, the LDP will provide a range of sites for potential inward investment and relocations through the employment land allocations.  These will provide an appropriate range and choice to meet the needs of a variety of potential employers.  This includes potential sites for larger employers as well as sites to accommodate smaller scale uses with the policy framework also providing scope for new and start-up businesses. 

 

Strategic Policy – SP 7: Welsh Language and Culture
 The Plan supports development proposals which safeguard and promote the interests of the Welsh language and culture in the County. Development proposals which have a detrimental impact on the vitality and viability of the Welsh language and culture will not be permitted unless the impact can be mitigated.
11.65   It should be noted that allocated employment sites, and thus the total land provision, includes non-operational land with scope for landscaping, buffer zones and other such uses.

11.66   The Welsh language and culture play an important role in the social, cultural and economic life of Carmarthenshire’s residents and visitors.  The proportion of Welsh speakers in Carmarthenshire is significantly higher than the Welsh national average and as such is a significant part of the social fabric of the County’s communities, providing a strong sense of place and identity. 

 

11.67   The Plan seeks to ‘promote the Welsh language and culture’[25] and is committed to contributing to the Welsh Government’s long-term aim of achieving 1 million Welsh speakers by 2050[26].  To deliver on this aim, the Council will support and promote the Welsh language by ensuring that there are sufficient and proportionate employment and housing opportunities to sustain both the rural and urban communities in the County.  In doing so, the Plan seeks to ensure that the local population remain in Carmarthenshire rather than leave in search of work opportunities and housing.  

 

11.68   The need to safeguard and promote the Welsh language applies to developments proposed across the County and is not restricted to specific areas within the County.  Development proposals will be required to acknowledge the official status of the Welsh language and commit to treating the Welsh and English languages equally.

 

11.69   Specific policies will provide further guidance to ensure that development of an appropriate scale, type and character is delivered to meet the needs of the communities.  Furthermore, it will aim to ensure that development occurs at a rate which can be absorbed and assimilated without damaging the character of the community. 

 

Strategic Policy – SP 8: Infrastructure 
 Development will need to be directed to locations where the infrastructure, services and facilities considered necessary to deliver and support the development proposal are available. 
 Development proposals will need to demonstrate that there is sufficient capacity in the existing infrastructure to deliver and support the proposed development. Where this cannot be achieved, proposals will need to demonstrate that suitable arrangements are in place to provide the infrastructure capacity considered necessary to deliver and support the development.
 Planning obligations may be sought to ensure that the infrastructure, services and facilities needed to deliver and support the development are delivered.

11.70   The Plan also seeks to safeguard and promote the Welsh language in Carmarthenshire through other relevant policy objectives, namely through the provision of housing and affordable housing, promoting a vibrant economy and employment opportunities and the provision and retention of community facilities.

Strategic Policy – SP 8: Infrastructure 
 Development will need to be directed to locations where the infrastructure, services and facilities considered necessary to deliver and support the development proposal are available. 
 Development proposals will need to demonstrate that there is sufficient capacity in the existing infrastructure to deliver and support the proposed development. Where this cannot be achieved, proposals will need to demonstrate that suitable arrangements are in place to provide the infrastructure capacity considered necessary to deliver and support the development.
 Planning obligations may be sought to ensure that the infrastructure, services and facilities needed to deliver and support the development are delivered.

11.71   The provision of appropriate infrastructure, services and facilities is vital to ensure the delivery of the Plan’s policies and proposals.  Appropriate infrastructure is key to facilitate development but is also a necessity to support the ongoing needs and demands of a development and Carmarthenshire’s communities.

 

11.72   The infrastructural requirements of developments will vary greatly according to their location, existing infrastructure provision, scale and type.  In considering the needs of development proposals the following infrastructure, services and facilities may be required:

 

·                Roads and other transport facilities including sustainable transport;

·                Schools and other educational facilities;

·                Affordable Housing;

·                Health;

·                Public open spaces and green infrastructure;

·                Flood defences;

·                Leisure, sporting and recreation;

·                Utility services;

·                Biodiversity and environmental protection;

·                Community facilities;

·                Other facilities and services considered necessary

 

11.73    The requirements of planning obligations will take into consideration the financial viability of a proposed development.  In instances where there is dispute regarding the impact which the requirements have upon the financial viability of the scheme, the applicant will be required to meet the costs of securing an independent viability appraisal, completed by a suitably qualified and approved third party.

 

11.74   The Plan seeks to ensure that the infrastructure, services and facilities needed to support development is delivered in a timely manner prior to, or upon commencement, of the development, or where appropriate phased through the development process.  The Plan encourages the delivery of infrastructure is undertaken in a coordinated manner with minimal disruption caused to existing communities. 

 

Strategic Policy – SP 9: Gypsy and Traveller Provision
 Land will be allocated within the Llanelli area to meet the identified need for Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation and to allow for the potential future expansion of Gypsy and Traveller Households.
11.75   Contributions to infrastructure will be secured through Planning Obligations in accordance with the legislative and policy framework provided.[27]

11.76   To consider the future Gypsy and Traveller provision within Carmarthenshire, the County Council has undertaken and published a Gypsy Traveller Accommodation Needs Assessment (GTAA) which identifies the current unmet need for Gypsy and Traveller pitches within the County. The Assessment considered the methodology set out by Welsh Government Guidance and outlines two types of the assessment of need; the first considers the first 5 years of the GTAA period; and the second considers the full 15 year GTAA period.

 

11.77   Based on this assessment, Carmarthenshire’s estimated provision for the first 5 years is for 29 additional pitches. A large proportion of this need has arisen from households living in bricks and mortar, and new household growth from within these households. The make-up of this need is located within Llanelli, where a large number of these households had previously lived on the public site at Penybryn.

 

11.78   An estimate has also been made for newly arising Gypsy and Traveller households in years 6-15 of the GTAA. This would include, for example, young adults living on existing sites who, in time, will form their own household and therefore would require their own pitch. The GTAA estimates a need for a 10 further pitches in years 6-15, totalling a requirement of 39 pitches through to 2031.

 

11.79   Further evidence will be provided which will consider the pitch requirement for the last 2 years of the Plan period.

 

11.80   In accordance with the Housing (Wales) Act 2014, the Council must undertake a new GTAA every five years. The requirement and take-up of pitches will be closely monitored through the Annual Monitoring Report and the requirement for additional pitches will be reviewed in the latter part of the Plan period through the monitoring framework.

 

Strategic Policy – SP 10: The Visitor Economy
 Proposals for tourism related developments will be supported where they:
 
 (a) add value to our visitor economy; and,
 (b) preserve our social, economic and environmental fabric for future generations; and, 
 (c) are sustainably located.
11.81   Specific criteria based policies to support the development of Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation will be considered within the Deposit LDP.

11.82   Tourism is a key component of Carmarthenshire’s economy. It is a major source of employment and revenue supporting over 6,000 full time equivalent jobs either directly or indirectly. It generates over £434m revenue to the County’s economy annually (STEAM Trend Report 2017).[28]

 

11.83   The County is home to a wide range of attractions, including Ffos Las Racecourse, the National Botanic Gardens and Pembrey Country Park. Carmarthenshire is the “cycling hub of Wales”, with the Cycling Strategy capturing the Council’s aspirations to be a national lead in the provision of cycling infrastructure events and development.[29]

 

11.84   Tourism is a dynamic industry with a wide demographic / customer base. Carmarthenshire is well poised to capitalise on the sector’s potential given that it is a beautiful county located within a four hour drive of London and within easy reach of Ireland via sea. The ever changing demands and trends within the sector do however provide challenges in terms of drafting 15 year land use planning policies. 

 

11.85   This strategic policy sets the framework for a policy approach within the Revised LDP that is sufficiently responsive and flexible to market demand up to 2033, whilst also seeking to protect the very communities, landscape and townscape that makes Carmarthenshire a fantastic place to visit and enjoy. Whilst the strategic policy provides the overarching context, it will be for the specific policies to provide the detail. This would include clarifying any role that the settlement limits of defined settlements play in informing the determination of proposals.

 

11.86   In interpreting this policy, it should be noted that tourism related developments includes new, as well as extensions to existing facilities. Extensions to existing facilities should be subordinate in scale and function to the existing facility and proposals that constitute substantive extensions should be construed as new development.

 

Adding Value

11.87   Proposals can add value to the County’s visitor economy by contributing to the creation of a diverse, high quality, all year round destination and accommodation offer. Economic benefits could range from an increase in visitor numbers and visitor days to job creation, contributing to a wider mix of accommodation and attraction types – as well as extending the tourism season beyond the summer months. There are opportunities for proponents to seek to align to and support those emerging corporate priorities, including the Council’s cycling aspirations. It is accepted that added value will be commensurate with the scale and nature of the proposal.  

 

Respecting the County’s social, economic and environmental fabric

11.88   A “One Carmarthenshire” approach underpins this policy. All parts of the County possess qualities that contribute to the overall sense of place. These include landscape, nature conservation, social fabric and built environment. These are assets which must be protected for our future generations and cannot be unduly compromised by tourism related development.

 

11.89   There should also be an emphasis on high quality in all aspects of proposals, particularly design. In considering the acceptability of proposals, consideration will be given to location, siting, design and scale, access to the primary and core highway network and the impact of any resultant in traffic generation. Furthermore, the extent to which the site is serviceable by public transport, walking and cycling are important considerations. The scale, size and type of any proposals will be appraised along with siting and impact. Proposals should reflect the character and appearance of the area with appropriate landscaping and screening utilised as required.

 

Sustainably located

11.90   Tourism related development should be directed to sustainable locations. Regard should be had to the LDP spatial strategy in determining the appropriateness of any location.  In this respect the scale and nature of the proposal will be important considerations, as will its siting, appropriateness and its spatial context. The specific policies will provide further more specific guidance on the implementation of this spatially driven approach.

 

11.91   Tourism related proposals should reflect the character of the area and the impacts on the vicinity of the site as part of a place making approach. A recognition of the sense of place within the vicinity of the proposal should be implicit within the context of the cluster based approach which groups the settlement framework.

 

11.92   In spatial terms, this would indicate that those larger scale high trip generating tourism proposals lend themselves to being situated in the south of the County where the infrastructure is in place to support them.

 

11.93   In noting the established primarily coastal offer that characterises the south west of the County, due regard will need to be given to any landscape impact arising from any potential for an over intensification of uses.  

 

11.94   The County’s rural areas are well placed to accommodate proposals for high quality and sustainable proposals that are of an appropriate scale. Proposals should respect the County’s assets whilst supporting vibrant rural communities.

 

Strategic Policy – SP 11: Placemaking, Sustainability and High Quality Design
 In order to facilitate sustainable development, new development should acknowledge local distinctiveness and sense of place, and be designed to high standards that are adaptable to climate change.
 
 In order to achieve this, all development should:
 
 a) Contribute towards the creation of attractive, safe places and public spaces, which enhance the well-being of communities, including safeguarding amenity, landscaping, the public realm and the provision of open space and recreation;
 b) Retain and where appropriate incorporate new green infrastructure which encourages opportunities to enhance biodiversity and ecological connectivity;
 c) Be adaptable to climate change and utilise materials and resources appropriate to the area within which it is located;
 d) Exhibit and demonstrate a clear understanding of the existing natural and built heritage, local character and sense of place;
 e) Be accessible and integrated allowing permeability and ease of movement;
 f) Have regard to the generation, treatment and disposal of waste;
 g) Manage water sustainably, including incorporating sustainable urban drainage systems (SuDS) into development proposals where feasible.
11.95   Some tourism related developments, by their very nature, must be located in the countryside. It is important that these developments do not have any significant negative impact on the landscape, natural environment or amenity.

Strategic Policy – SP 11: Placemaking, Sustainability and High Quality Design
 In order to facilitate sustainable development, new development should acknowledge local distinctiveness and sense of place, and be designed to high standards that are adaptable to climate change.
 
 In order to achieve this, all development should:
 
 a) Contribute towards the creation of attractive, safe places and public spaces, which enhance the well-being of communities, including safeguarding amenity, landscaping, the public realm and the provision of open space and recreation;
 b) Retain and where appropriate incorporate new green infrastructure which encourages opportunities to enhance biodiversity and ecological connectivity;
 c) Be adaptable to climate change and utilise materials and resources appropriate to the area within which it is located;
 d) Exhibit and demonstrate a clear understanding of the existing natural and built heritage, local character and sense of place;
 e) Be accessible and integrated allowing permeability and ease of movement;
 f) Have regard to the generation, treatment and disposal of waste;
 g) Manage water sustainably, including incorporating sustainable urban drainage systems (SuDS) into development proposals where feasible.
11.96   Planning Policy Wales sets out the land use planning policies of the Welsh Government (WG).  Its central objective is to promote and provide a framework for sustainable development within Wales.  One of the key factors in achieving this is the promotion of sustainability through good design.

 

11.97   The WG is committed to promoting more sustainable forms of development, and their sustainable development scheme, One Wales: One Planet, (2009) sets out their approach to sustainable development.  Through the planning system in Wales, good design can be used to play a major role in delivering sustainable forms of development and PPW and TAN 12: Design provide guidance on how the planning system in Wales can achieve this.

 

11.98   Achieving good design and creating an effective sense of place requires an understanding of the relationship between all elements of the natural and built environment. Design is a fundamental component in creating sustainable development, which is itself at the forefront of the Well-being of Future Generations Act 2015. 

 

11.99   The Act means that public bodies such as local authorities must work to ensure that developments should acknowledge and seek to improve the economic, social, environmental and cultural well-being of an area.

 

11.100 There are environmental, social, as well as economic benefits to creating a well-designed development.  Designing a high quality environment is an essential ingredient to achieving economic prosperity as it will be more attractive to potential investors as well as being more appealing to customers, key workers and tourists.  Similarly, better designed buildings and places for work will result in more productive employees.  At the same time, well-designed neighbourhoods will create happier and healthier communities that will be more committed to the maintenance of their surroundings.  The environmental benefits might include less pollution through the reduction in traffic, the protection or enhancement of biodiversity, and the conservation of the built heritage.  All these benefits are central to achieving sustainable development and to the long term economic prosperity of an area.

 

11.101 This policy is intended to ensure that development proposals can achieve positive economic, social, environmental and cultural outcomes, and can minimise adverse ones. It will, along with the more detailed policies to be developed in the Deposit LDP, form the basis of all planning decisions, and indicators will be developed as part of the Plan’s monitoring framework to show the effectiveness of the policies.


 

Healthy Habits - People have a good quality of life, and make healthy choices about their lives and environment.
11.102 The well-being implications arising from health conditions and varying life expectancy are recognised within this Preferred Strategy through its emphasis on protecting and enhancing the County’s built & historic as well as natural environment.

 

11.103 The Preferred Strategy embraces the wellbeing potential afforded by our natural environment and access to our green spaces, particularly if this is done in a connected way. It is also noted that such spaces provide an opportunity to soften the impact of our changing climate. 

 

11.104 Whilst it is recognised that there is an overlap between the themes and the assignment of policies the following having been identified under this theme:

·         Strategic Policy – SP 13: Protection and Enhancement of the Natural Environment

·         Strategic Policy – SP 14: Protection and Enhancement of the Built and Historic Environment

11.105 It should be noted that specific policies will be developed as part of the Deposit LDP and will as appropriate be identified within the context of the relevant theme.

 

Strategic Policy – SP 12: Rural Development 
 The Plan supports development proposals which will contribute towards the sustainability of the County’s rural communities. Development proposals in rural areas should demonstrate that they support the role of the rural settlements in the settlement hierarchy to meet the housing, employment and social needs of Carmarthenshire’s rural communities.
11.106 The following policies seek to support the delivery of the Plan’s strategic objectives, but also provide high level links and broad conformity with the Well-Being Goals.

11.107 The rural settlements of the County have an important role to play in improving the sustainability of the wider geographical area in which they are located as well as the County’s overall sustainability.  The Plan’s strategy and settlement hierarchy reflects the significant role which the rural communities play through supporting growth of a proportionate scale which can make a positive contribution towards the long-term sustainability of the rural economy and rural communities. 

 

11.108 Proportionate and sensitive development can provide the level of growth required to retain and enhance the services and facilities provided in the County’s rural settlements.  It can also serve to safeguard and promote the Welsh language in rural areas and enhance rural employment opportunities.  However, the Plan seeks to ensure that development and growth does not have negative impacts upon a community’s sustainability.  Key to this is ensuring that development is not permitted at a scale or rate which would affect the community’s ability to absorb and adapt to growth and change.  This is imperative when considering the impacts which development can have upon the local infrastructure, the vitality of the Welsh language and the sustainability of the countryside and natural environment. 

 

Strategic Policy – SP 13: Protection and Enhancement of the Natural Environment
 Proposals for development will be expected to protect and enhance the County’s natural environment. 
 
 Proposals must reflect the role an ecologically connected environment has in protecting and enhancing biodiversity, defining the landscape, creating a sense of place and contribute to a sense of Well-being.
11.109 The Council is committed to addressing and safeguarding the needs of rural communities and to this end have established a Rural Affairs Task Group with the aim of assessing the needs of rural communities and taking positive steps to address these.  The Plan supports the aims of the Task Group through its strategy and policies, principally through policies relating to the provision of housing and affordable housing, the economy and employment, the Welsh language and the natural environment; development proposals will need to demonstrate that they accord with these policies as well as the provisions of national planning policy.[30]

11.110  Carmarthenshire has a rich and diverse natural environment with a number of designated sites and protected species. This policy seeks to recognise the quality and value of the natural environment and landscapes across the Plan area, and their fundamental role in defining the County’s identity, character and distinctiveness.

 

11.111 The protection and enhancement of these elements form an important component of the Strategy, which looks to reflect not only those international and national designations, but also the contribution of sites and landscapes at the local level. The LDP will also seek to conserve and enhance natural resources such as geodiversity, water, soil and air quality.

This policy also recognises the often interconnected components of the natural environment and their contribution towards maintaining and enhancing biodiversity, as well as the creation of attractive and cohesive spaces for communities and the well-being of Carmarthenshire’s population.

 

11.112 Protection and enhancement of connectivity, and the contribution it makes the quality of Carmarthenshire’s landscape, natural environment and biodiversity is an important consideration. As a result, the potential impact of the Plan and its policies and proposals upon nature conservation interests, amenity value, water/soil/air quality, hydrology, geology and geomorphological regimes will continue to inform the plan-making process.

 

11.113 A Habitats Regulation Assessment (HRA) has been undertaken to assess the impacts of the Plan on European protected sites, including those in the candidate stage of designation.

 

11.114 Whilst the Plan recognises the need for new development for both social and economic purposes, the Council will, where appropriate, seek to safeguard Carmarthenshire’s environmental qualities. We will seek to ensure the protection and enhancement of the natural environment through detailed policy.

 

Strategic Policy – SP 14: Protection and Enhancement of the Built and Historic Environment. 
 Development proposals should preserve or enhance the built and historic environment of the County, its cultural, townscape and landscape assets, and, where appropriate, their setting.
 
 Proposals will be expected to promote high quality design that reinforces local character and respects and enhances the cultural and historic qualities of the plan area.
11.115 In addition, and reflecting the duties placed upon Local  Authorities , we will have regard to the National Park designation and the purpose for which it is designated, where it may affect the consideration of planning proposals.

11.116 Carmarthenshire has a rich and diverse historical and cultural built heritage, with a range of Conservation Areas, Listed Buildings, and Scheduled Ancient Monuments etc.  The recognition of the Plan area’s built heritage and itsconservation is essential providing a sense of history, character and to as a sense of place.

 

11.117 The Plan area also contains archaeological sites and features including many of which have not yet been discovered. The Policy and the Plan aims, in conjunction with primary legislation on the built environment and historic buildings, to safeguard the cultural integrity of the historic settlements, features and buildings within the Plan area, and where applicable contribute to the enhancement of the historic and built environment.  This recognises that our historic assets are irreplaceable resources and their conservation provides social, cultural, economic and environmental benefits.

 

11.118 Such historic assets include:

·         listed buildings;

·         conservation areas;

·         historic parks, gardens and landscapes; and

·         undesignated assets which provide character to the area.

 

11.119 The County’s historic buildings, townscape and landscape should be regarded as assets and positively conserved and enhanced for the benefit of residents and visitors alike. The special and often diverse character of the County, with its unspoilt countryside, industrial heritage and wealth of historic towns and villages, reflects the changes experienced through the ages, linking the past to the present and maintaining the area's distinct cultural identity.

Such features and structures not only affected by change and neglect, but also by changes to their setting.  As such this is an important consideration in making decisions on proposals which may have an effect.

11.120 The need for new appropriate development across the County must be recognised, and as such the LDP will seek to direct and manage potential growth in a way which respects the importance of the built and historic environment.

Strong Connections - Strongly connected people, places and organisations that are able to adapt to change
11.121 This Preferred Strategy recognises the importance of community and sense of place by seeking to distribute new development in manner that recognises and respects the role and function of our settlements.

 

11.122 By distributing growth in a sustainable manner and in a way that acknowledges our key connectivity routes, this Preferred Strategy can assist in the creation of connected communities that are resilient, vibrant and can foster a well-being amongst residents.

 

11.123 Whilst it is recognised that there is an overlap between the themes and the assignment of policies the following having been identified under this theme:

 

·         Strategic Policy – SP 16:Sustainable Distribution – Settlement Framework

·         Strategic Policy – SP 17:Transport and Accessibility

·         Strategic Policy – SP 18:Mineral Resources

·         Strategic Policy – SP 19: Waste Management

 

11.124 It should be noted that specific policies will be developed as part of the Deposit LDP and will as appropriate be identified within the context of the relevant theme.

 

Strategic Policy – SP 15: Climate Change 
 Where development proposals respond to, are resilient to, adapt to and minimise the causes and impacts of climate change they will be supported. In particular proposals will be supported where they:
 
 a) Reflect sustainable transport principles and minimise the need to travel, particularly by private motor car;
 b) Avoid, or where appropriate, minimise the risk of flooding including the incorporation of measures such as SuDS and flood resilient design;
 c) Promote the energy hierarchy by reducing energy demand, promoting energy efficiency and increasing the supply of renewable energy;
 d) Incorporate appropriate climate responsive design solutions including orientation, layout, density and low carbon solutions (including design and construction methods) and utilise sustainable construction methods where feasible. 
 
 Proposals for development which are located within areas at risk from flooding will be resisted unless they accord with the provisions of Planning Policy Wales TAN 15.
11.125 The following policies seek to support the delivery of the Plan’s strategic objectives, but also provide high level links and broad conformity with the Well-Being Goals.

Strategic Policy – SP 15: Climate Change 
 Where development proposals respond to, are resilient to, adapt to and minimise the causes and impacts of climate change they will be supported. In particular proposals will be supported where they:
 
 a) Reflect sustainable transport principles and minimise the need to travel, particularly by private motor car;
 b) Avoid, or where appropriate, minimise the risk of flooding including the incorporation of measures such as SuDS and flood resilient design;
 c) Promote the energy hierarchy by reducing energy demand, promoting energy efficiency and increasing the supply of renewable energy;
 d) Incorporate appropriate climate responsive design solutions including orientation, layout, density and low carbon solutions (including design and construction methods) and utilise sustainable construction methods where feasible. 
 
 Proposals for development which are located within areas at risk from flooding will be resisted unless they accord with the provisions of Planning Policy Wales TAN 15.
11.126 The need to tackle climate change represents a fundamental challenge if sustainable development and the obligations under the Well-being of Future Generations Act 2105 are to be delivered.  The economic, social and environmental implications arising from Climate change will be profound and a failure to address it will result any effort to plan for sustainability unsuccessful.

 

11.127 The changing climate and the impacts for Wales predicted by the UK Climate Impacts Programme (UKCIP) present the planning system with serious challenges. In addressing them, Planning Policy Wales (PPW) outlines a series of objectives which should be taken into account during the preparation of a development plan.

 

11.128 The LDP categorises settlements into a hierarchy which reflects their relative sustainability. The Plan’s aspiration of minimising the need to travel, particularly by private motor car, and its contributory role towards the facilitation of an integrated transport strategy seeks to direct development to appropriate locations which serve to achieve this.

 

11.129 The potential impact of flood risk forms an important consideration in the assessment of the appropriateness of sites for inclusion within the LDP. In this regard, a precautionary approach will be adopted in the identification of sites for inclusion in the Plan.  The consideration of any proposals in respect of flooding have regard to the provisions of PPW and TAN15: Development and Flood Risk which provides guidance on assessing developments at risk from flooding.  

 

11.130 Proposals affected by flood risk will be required to submit a Flood Consequences Assessment as part of any planning application and the Council will consult with Natural Resources Wales (NRW). Where a site is in part impacted upon by flood risk, the developer will need to consider the impact of the risk on the developability of the remainder of the site.  Where appropriate they should undertake the necessary evidential work (including a flood consequences assessment and/or topographical survey) to the satisfaction of NRW.

 

11.131 Developments will be expected to exhibit good design principles to promote the efficient use of resources, including minimising waste and pollution generation, and maximising energy efficiency and the efficient use of other resources.  Reference should be had to policy SP X in relation to the waste and the waste hierarchy and minimisation of waste.

 

11.132 Development proposals will be expected to make full and appropriate use of land. The potential impacts of climate change should be central to the design process, including the contribution that location, density, layout and built form can make towards climate responsive developments.

 

11.133 The Welsh Government is committed to using the planning system to optimise renewable energy and low carbon energy generation.  PPW states that Local Planning Authorities can make a positive provision by considering the contribution that their area can make towards developing and facilitating renewable and low carbon energy, and enable this contribution to be delivered.  Renewable energy targets have been set by the Welsh Government, one target is for Wales to be generating 70% of its electricity consumption from renewable energy by 2030.

 

11.134 Proposals/land uses and land management practices will be encouraged where they help to secure and protect carbon sinks (including peat).  Such an approach will enhance resilience to the impacts of climate change and to reducing the causes of climate change through the protection of carbon sinks and as a sustainable energy source[31].

 

11.135 PPW sets out clear guidance in terms of requirements for climate responsive developments and sustainable buildings. Reference should be made to the Practice Guidance – Planning for Sustainable Buildings (WG, 2014).


Strategic Policy – SP 16: Sustainable Distribution – Settlement Framework
 The provision of growth and development will be directed to sustainable locations in accordance with the following spatial framework.

 

Cluster 1

Cluster 2

Cluster 3

Cluster 4

Cluster 5

Cluster 6

Tier 1 – Principle Centre

§  Carmarthen

§  Llanelli

§  Ammanford/

Crosshands

 

Tier 2 – Service Centre

§  Pontyates/

Meinciau/

Ponthenri

§  Burry Port

§  Pembrey

§  Fforest/Hendy

§  Llangennech

§  Trimsaran/

Carway

§  Brynamman

§  Glanamman/

Garnant

§  Pontyberem/

Bancffosfelen

§  Newcastle Emlyn

§  Llanybydder

§  Pencader

§  Llandovery

§  Llandeilo

§  Llangadog

§  St Clears/

§  Pwll Trap

§  Whitland

§  Laugharne

§  Kidwelly

§  Ferryside

Tier 3 – Sustainable Villages

§  Cynwyl Elfed

§  Llanybri

§  Llansteffan

§  Bronwydd

§  Cwmffrwd

§  Llangyndeyrn

§  Brechfa

§  Llangain

§  Idole/

Pentrepoeth

§  Peniel

§  Alltwalis

§  Llanpumpsite

§  Llandyfaoelog

§  Rhydargaeau

§  New Inn

§  Llanarthne

§  Capel Dewi

§  Nantgaredig

§  Pontargothi

§  Llanddarog

§  Porthyrhyd

§  Crwbin

§  Cwmduad

§  Mynyddygarreg

§  Five Roads/

Horeb

§  Llansaint / Broadway

§  Carmel

§  Cwmgwili

§  Foelgastell

§  Maesybont

§  Ystradowen

§  Drefach/

Felindre

§  Waengilwen

§  Llangeler

§  Pentrecwrt

§  Saron/Rhos

§  Llanllwni

§  Cwmann

§  Capen Iwan

§  Llanfihangel ar arth

§  Trelech

§  Pontyweli

§  Cenarth

§  Caio

§  Ffarmers

§  Llansawel

§  Rhydcymerau

§  Talley

§  Cwrt Henri

§  Llanfynydd

§  Llanwrda

§  Cwmdu

§  Cwmifor

§  Salem

§  Abergorlech

§  Llanboidy

§  Glandy Cross

§  Efailwen

§  Llangynin

§  Meidrim

§  Bancyfelin

§  Llangynog

§  Pendine

§  Llanddowror

§  Llanmiloe

§  Llanon

§  Llanedi

Tier 4 – Rural Villages

(No development limits)

§  Hermon

§  Abernant

§  Blaenycoed

§  Bancycapel

§  Nantycaws

§  Croesyceiliog

§  Felingwm Uchaf

§  Felincwm Isaf

§  Llanegwad

§  Pontantwn

§  Nebo

§  Talog

§  Cross Inn

§  Penybont

§  Whitemill

§  Pont-Newydd

§  Cynheidre

§  Four Roads

§  Capel Seion

§  Derwydd

§  Heol Ddu

§  Maesybont

§  Milo

§  Pantllyn

§  Pentregwenlais

§  Temple Bar

§  Cefnbrynbrain

§  Rhosamman

§  Drefach (Llandyfan)

§  Stag and Pheasant

§  Mynyddcerrig

§  Penboyr

§  Drefelin

§  Cwmpengraig

§  Cwmhiraeth

§  Pentrecagal

§  Pontarsais

§  Gwyddgrug

§  Dolgran

§  Bancyfford

§  Bryn Iwan

§  Pencarreg

§  Ffaldybrenin

§  Crugybar

§  Cwm-du

§  Ashfield Row

§  Felindre (Llangadog)

§  Cynghordy

§  Golden Grove

§  Broad Oak

§  Trapp

§  Manordeilo

§  Penybanc

§  Felindre, (Dryslwyn)

§  Dryslwyn

§  Rhydcymerau

§  Waunystrad Meurig

§  Bethlehem

§  Capel Isaac

§  Llangathen

§  Llansadwrn

§  Rhandirmwyn

§  Porthyrhyd

§  Pumsaint

§  Siloh

§  Cilycwm

§  Cwmfelin Mynach

§  Cwmbach

§  Blaenwaun

§  Llanglydwen

§  Cwmfelin Boeth

§  Cross Inn

§  Llansadurnen

§  Broadway

§  Red Roses

§  Llanfallteg

 


11.146 The Plan seeks to distribute growth and development spatially across the County having regard to the spatial strategy and spatial framework and national policy[32].  This emphasises the need for a settlement strategy to provide the basis for a spatial pattern of housing development, balancing social, economic and environmental needs. Whilst the majority of development will be directed to the top tiers of the settlement hierarchy, the diversity of the County is recognised and regard will be had to housing in rural areas and the value such areas play within the County, its communities and to the economy.

 

11.147 The Plan seeks to distribute the growth in a way which reflects the diversity of the settlement clusters and in a sustainable manner.  It will have regard to the role and function of the settlements but also accepts that some settlements which may by virtue of services and facilities available may not necessarily be the most appropriate options for all the growth.  This may reflect a number of factors not least environmental constraints but also historical delivery of growth within such settlements. Additionally, cross-border influences and proximity to adjacent settlements are influencing factors to varying extents. These include: Pontarddulais, Lampeter, Adpar, Narberth and Llandysul.

 

11.148 The approach will avoid any assumption that that every settlement in every tier must contribute towards growth, rather it will consider the settlements on their merits having whilst having regard to their sustainability and position within the framework. Therefore, it does not seek to apportion development spatially within the hierarchy purely by the use of proportional distribution or quotas.

 

11.149 The strategy accepts that the principal centres will be the main focus of growth, with its precise spread across the County being responsive and not constrained by a rigid proportional distribution.  Regard will be made to the scale and character as well as the role of the settlement.

 

11.150 The following sets out an indicative apportionment of residential growth by tier; this will be further developed as the Plan progresses through its preparatory stages:

 

·         Principal Centre 50 - 55%;

·         Service Centre 15 - 20%;

·         Sustainable Villages 15 - 20%;

·         Rural Villages 15- 20% , and

·         Non-Defined Rural Settlements < 1%.

 

11.151 The rural villages will have provision for small scale housing opportunities focused on infill and logical extensions as well as small scale rural exceptions for affordable housing. This provides scope for limited market housing provision. 

 

11.152 Within the undefined rural settlements, new housing development will be limited to small scale opportunities where local needs affordable housing is provided. Such proposals will be focused around infill and opportunities for logical extensions.  Both these tiers will not have development limits with proposals considered through criteria based policies.

 

11.153 Whilst the above refers specifically to residential growth, the settlement framework will, in conjunction with specific policies, also guide the consideration of appropriate locations and scale of other developments (including employment).

 

11.154 The following sets out an indicative outline on the nature of development likely by tier including their scale and type.  Further details will be developed as part of the Deposit Plan, as will the specific criteria policies necessary to support to consideration of proposals such as rural exceptions and defined rural villages:

 

Principal Centres

Strategic Sites

Large and small scale Employment Areas

Housing Allocations

Small housing sites (under 5 homes);

Affordable Housing Provision on sites of 5 or more units

Windfall housing opportunities

 

Service Centres:

Small Scale Employment Areas

Housing Allocations

Affordable Housing Provision on sites of 5 or more units

Small housing sites (under 5 homes);

Windfall housing opportunities

 

Sustainable Villages:

Housing Allocations

Affordable housing on sites of 5 or more units

Small housing sites (under 5 homes);

Windfall housing opportunities

Small Scale Rural Exceptions Schemes for Affordable Housing adjoining settlement boundaries

Rural Villages (No Development Limits):

Small sites – housing through infill or logical extensions/rounding off.

Small Scale Rural Exceptions Schemes for Affordable Housing

 

Non Defined Rural Settlements:

Strategic Policy – SP 17: Transport and Accessibility
 Sustainable and deliverable development requires an integrated, accessible, reliable, efficient, safe and sustainable transport network to underpin delivery. The Plan therefore contributes to the delivery of a sustainable transport system and associated infrastructure through:
 
 a. Reducing the need to travel, particularly by private motor car; 
 b. Addressing social inclusion through increased accessibility to employment, services and facilities;
 c. Supporting and where applicable enhancing alternatives to the motor car, such as public transport (including park and ride facilities and encourage the adoption of travel plans) and active transport through cycling and walking; 
 d. Re-enforcing the function and role of settlements in accordance with the settlement framework;
 e. Promoting the efficient use of the transport network;
 f. Enhancing accessibility to employment, homes, services and facilities at locations accessible to appropriate transport infrastructure – including significant trip generating proposals; 
 g. The incorporation of design and access solutions within developments to promote accessibility. Provide walking and cycling routes, linking in with active travel networks and green infrastructure networks; and
 h. Adopt a sustainable approach to the design, function and layout of new development, including providing appropriate levels of parking.
Local needs affordable housing and Small Scale Rural Exceptions Schemes for Affordable Housing

 

11.155 The strategy reflects and promotes the principles of sustainability and accessibility to essential services and facilities with the aim of achieving viable, self-supporting settlements and sustainable communities thus increasing social inclusion and cohesion. The settlement framework reflects the sustainability of settlements where services, jobs, shopping and leisure facilities are located whilst recognising the diversity of the County and its communities including the rural areas.

 

11.156    In achieving the above the strategy has regard to the highway and rail network along with accessibility to public transport and the potential for growth of settlements reflecting levels of accessibility (to be considered as part of the Deposit LDP).

 

11.157 Due to the diversity of the County, accessibility and the aim of reducing the need to travel (and reducing CO2 emissions) remains a challenge for a large part of Carmarthenshire. This challenge is particularly evident when addressing the need to sustain rural areas and ensure that their communities do not suffer social exclusion. This must also relate to a realistic acceptance that the motor car remains an important means of travel in such areas.

 

11.158 Minimising travel may also be possible through an integrated transport strategy and the development of self-sustaining communities (including the availability of services and facilities) and the availability of alternatives through appropriate initiatives such as ‘Bwcabus’.  It is however also recognised that as technology progresses the potential impact or otherwise of the motorcar will change. 

 

11.159 The LDP will seek to positively promote solutions which encourage access to technological changes, including electric charging points, in promoting a reduction in harmful emissions and enhancing social inclusion and accessibility.

 

11.160    Road schemes that are identified within the relevant Transport Plan will, where there is sufficient certainty, be identified within the Deposit LDP and where appropriate safeguarded.

Where a scheme is identified as requiring further feasibility, design and preparation it may not be identified in the Deposit LDP as this reflects the potential for an absence of clear indications of delivery.

 

11.161 The role of the County as a centre for cycling in Wales is recognised and the publication of the Cycling Strategy will be considered and where appropriate reflected as the LDP progresses.  In this respect the role of the cycling network as an economic driver and leisure and tourism asset is recognised.  Similarly, its contribution to the promotion of accessibility and benefits to our communities is also recognised - as is that afforded through the public footpath network and bridleways.


 

Strategic Policy – SP 18: Mineral Resources
 The County’s identified mineral resources will be sustainably managed by: 
 
 a) Ensuring supply by maintaining an adequate landbank of permitted aggregate reserves (hard rock and sand and gravel) throughout the Plan period;
 b) Encouraging the efficient and appropriate use of high quality minerals and maximising the potential for the re-use and recycling of suitable minerals as an alternative to primary won aggregates;
 c) Safeguarding areas underlain by minerals of economic importance where they could be worked in the future to ensure that such resources are not unnecessarily sterilised by other forms of development;
 d) The use of buffer zones to reduce the conflict between mineral development and sensitive development;
 e) Securing appropriate restoration which can deliver specific environmental and community benefits.
11.162 The LDP should ensure that the County provides mineral resources to meet society’s needs and that such resources, are safeguarded from sterilisation.  In doing so, the LDP seeks to ensure that a proper balance is struck between this fundamental requirement, the need to ensure a prudent use of these finite resources, and the protection of existing amenity and the environment.

 

11.163 Carmarthenshire has a wide variety of mineral resources as a result of its complex geology.  The main feature in the south of the County is the broad sweep of the Coal Measures outcrop, fringed to the north by Carboniferous Limestone.  Limestone quarrying is the largest of the extractive industries in the County.  The northern parts of the County are underlain by older rocks of Ordovician and Silurian age, mainly sandstones, shales and slates.  The economic significance of these is variable.

 

11.164 The South Wales Regional Technical Statement (RTS) 2014 sets out the contribution that each constituent local authority should make towards meeting the regional demand for aggregates (both hard rock and sand and gravel).  The LDP’s second Annual Monitoring Report (AMR, 2016/17) establishes that the County’s landbank figures, for both hard rock and sand and gravel, is notably in excess of the minimum requirements set out in Minerals Technical Advice Note (MTAN) 1: Aggregates, and consequently there is no requirement to allocate new sites for mineral development.

Strategic Policy – SP 19: Waste Management
 Provision will be made to facilitate the sustainable management of waste through: 
 
 a) The allocation of adequate appropriate land to provide for an integrated network of waste management facilities;
 b) Supporting proposals for waste management which involve the management of waste in accordance with the ranking set out within in the waste hierarchy; 
 c) Supporting proposals for new in-building waste management facilities at existing and allocated industrial sites which are suitable for waste management facilities;
 d) Acknowledging that certain types of waste facility may need to be located outside the development limits of settlements;
 e) Ensuring that provision is made for the sustainable management of waste in all new development, including securing opportunities to minimise the production of waste.
 
 f)
11.165 The system of waste management and waste planning is undergoing a rapid transition.  Targets for waste minimisation and recycling and will require new methods of managing waste, together with a potential significant increase in the number of facilities to enable these methods to be implemented and the targets to be met.

 

11.166 In accordance with the Overarching Waste Strategy Document for Wales Towards Zero Waste (TZW), and Planning Policy Wales, local authorities are required to develop a sustainable approach to the management of waste, including the support of proposals for waste operations which move the management of waste up the waste hierarchy, and the identification of land appropriate to facilitate an integrated and sustainable network of waste facilities.

 

11.167 New technological advances and changes in legislation, policies and practices, mean that modern in-building waste management facilities now have the external appearance of any other industrial unit, and contain methods of industrial de-manufacturing or energy generation no different to modern industrial processes.  The in-principle suitability of B2 industrial sites therefore has become accepted and allows a greater scope of possible sites. 

 

11.168 Technical Advice Note (TAN) 21 sets out that collaboration between local planning authorities will be necessary to monitor progress towards establishing an integrated and adequate network for the disposal of waste and recovery of mixed municipal waste.  Consequently, the Country has been split into 3 regions which each have the task of producing an annual Waste Planning Monitoring Report (WPMR). 

 

11.169 One of the principal roles of the WPMR is to present data to enable the effective monitoring of how the region’s residual waste arising’s are managed, particularly the progress being made towards alternatives to landfill, in order to assess the region’s performance against the targets set out in TZW.  The information and analysis presented in the reports should provide a basis for local authorities (and other organisations) to take action on the waste arising’s within their area.  The Reports should also provide an information base to assist the waste management industry make key investment decisions.

 

11.170 In formulating development proposals, consideration should be given to the implications for waste.  The location and scale of developments should have regard to the availability and capacity of waste management facilities in the area.  In this respect, proposals should not result in unnecessary trip generation. 


 

Glossary

Adopted Plan

This is the Final stage of Local Development Plan preparatory process - where the Local Development Plan becomes the statutory Development Plan, for the purposes of the Act.

Adopted

The final confirmation of the development plan as its land use planning policy by the Local Planning Authority (LPA).

Affordable Housing

Housing provided to those whose needs are not met by the open market. Affordable housing should:

· meet the needs of eligible households, including availability at low enough cost for them to afford, determined with regard to local incomes and local house prices; and

· include provision for the home to remain affordable for
future eligible households, or if a home ceases to be affordable or staircasing to full ownership takes place, any subsidy should generally be recycled to provide replacement affordable housing.

This breaks down into two sub-categories:

· social rented housing - provided by local authorities and registered social landlords where rent levels have regard to the Assembly Government’s guideline rents and benchmark rents; and

· Intermediate housing - where prices or rents are above those of social rented housing but below market housing prices or rents. This can include equity sharing schemes (for example Homebuy). Intermediate housing differs from low cost market housing, which the Assembly Government does not consider to be affordable housing

for the purpose of the land use planning system. (TAN 2: Glossary).

Amenity

A positive element or elements that contribute to the overall character or enjoyment of an area.  For example, open land, trees, historic buildings and the inter relationship between them, or less tangible factors such as tranquillity.

Ancillary

Where the use of land or buildings differ from the primary use and is of a lesser importance and are permitted because of their association with the primary use.

Annual Monitoring Report (AMR)

This will assess the extent to which policies in the local development plan are being successfully implemented (Regulation 37 of the Town and Country Planning (Local Development Plan) (Wales) Regulations 2005.

Baseline/Pre Change Baseline

A description of the present state of an area against which to measure change.

Biodiversity

The variability among living organisms from all sources including animals, plants, birds, insects and fish, and the habitats of which they are part.

Character

A term relating to Conservation Areas or Listed Buildings, but also to the appearance of any urban or rural location in terms of its landscape, townscape or the layout of streets and open spaces, often giving places their own distinct identity.

Candidate Site

Candidate Sites are those nominated by anyone for consideration by the LPA as allocations in an emerging LDP.

Candidate Sites Register

Register of candidate sites prepared following a call for candidate sites by the LPA.

Coalescence

The merging or joining up of two separate settlements or of separate elements of settlement. 

Commitments

Undeveloped land with current planning permission or land which is currently being developed.

Community

People living in a defined geographical area, or who share other interests and therefore form communities of interest.

Completions

Planning consents for development which have been constructed or brought into operational use.

Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL)

The Community Infrastructure Levy is a planning charge, introduced by the Planning Act 2008 as a tool for local planning authorities to help deliver infrastructure to support the development of their area. It came into force on 6 April 2010 through the Community Infrastructure Levy Regulations 2010.

Community Involvement Scheme (CIS)

Sets out the project plan and policies of the LPA for involving local communities, including businesses, in the preparation of local development plans. The CIS is submitted to the Welsh Government as part of the Delivery Agreement for agreement.

Consensus building

A process of early dialogue with targeted interest groups to understand relevant viewpoints and agree a course of action.

Conservation Areas

An area designated by the LPA under legislation which is of a special architectural or historic interest the character or appearance of which is desirable to preserve or enhance.

Consultation

A formal process in which comments are invited on a particular topic or set of topics, or a draft document.

Contextual Indicator

An indicator used to monitor changes in the context within which the plan is being implemented or prepared.

Delivery Agreement (DA)

Document comprising the LPA’s timetable for the preparation of the LDP together with its Community Involvement Scheme, submitted to the Welsh Government for agreement.

Density

In the case of residential development, a measurement of either the number of habitable rooms per hectare (or acre) or number of dwellings per hectare (or acre).

Deposit Documents

These include the deposit LDP, the Sustainability Appraisal report, the initial consultation report, the candidate sites register, the Review Report (if appropriate), any relevant supporting documents.

Development Limits

A line drawn in order to define the area of a settlement within which development is acceptable in principle subject to detailed consideration of environmental, amenity, access, public service provision and other considerations. Areas outside the limits are regarded as the open countryside.

Employment Land

Land used for the purposes of employment by one or more of the following: offices, manufacturing, research and development, storage and distribution (see also Use Classes).

Engagement

A process which encourages substantive deliberation in a community. Proactive attempt to involve any given group of people/section of the community.

Evidence Base

Interpretation of Baseline or other information/data to provide the basis for plan policy.

Habitat

An area of nature conservation interest.

Habitats Regulations Assessment (HRA)

The screening and appropriate assessment of options required under Part 6 Chapter 8 of the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 (as amended) (the Habitats Regulations) - a recognised iterative process which helps determine the likely significant effect on a plan or programme and (where appropriate) assess adverse impacts on the integrity of a European site. The assessment is required to be undertaken by a competent authority in respect of plans or projects which are likely to have a significant effect (alone and in combination with other plans and projects) on a “European site” (see paragraph 5.1.2 of TAN 5), or as a matter of policy a proposed “European site” or Ramsar site, under the provisions of Article 6(3) of the EC Directive 92/43/ECC (the Habitats Directive), regulations 61 and 102 of the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations (as amended) 2010, and, regulation 25 of the Offshore Marine Conservation (Natural Habitats &c) Regulations 2007.

Infill Development

The development of a small gap between existing buildings. To qualify as infill, the proposed development must be related to the size and character of the particular settlement.

Infrastructure

Includes services such as roads, transport facilities, water supplies, sewerage and associated waste water treatment facilities, waste management facilities, energy supplies (electricity and gas) and distribution networks and telecommunications infrastructure. Soft infrastructure includes ICT and telecommunications.

Integrated Community Strategy (ICS)

Required by the Local Government (Wales) Measure 2009 (Part 2: Sections 37-46) with the aim of improving the social, environmental and economic well-being of their areas. Also referred to as a “Single Integrated Plan”.

Local Planning Authority (LPA)

A planning authority responsible for the preparation of an LDP.

Local Development Plan (LDP)

The required statutory development plan for each local planning authority area in Wales under Part 6 of the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004. A land use plan that is subject to independent examination, which will form the statutory development plan for a local planning authority area for the purposes of the Act. It should include a vision, strategy, area-wide policies for development types, land allocations, and where necessary policies and proposals for key areas of change and protection. Policies and allocations must be shown geographically on the Proposals Map forming part of the Plan.

Local Well-being Plan

Under The Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 Public Service Boards will be established for each local authority area; it is intended that each will prepare a Well-being Plan to replace the SIP by April 2018 (s.39).

Marine Plan

The Welsh National Marine Plan prepared under the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009.

Market Housing

Private housing for rent or sale where the price is set in the open market. (TAN2: Glossary).

Mitigation

Measures to avoid, reduce or offset significant adverse effects.

Mixed Use

Developments or proposals comprising of more than one use type on a single site.

National Development Framework (NDF)

Provision is made under Planning (Wales Act) 2015 for the preparation of an NDF. Prepared by the Welsh Government the NDF will set out a 20 year land use framework for Wales and will replace the current Wales Spatial Plan.

National Nature Reserve (NNR)

An area designated for its national importance in nature conservation terms and managed through joint nature reserve agreements with landowners etc,

Objective/Strategic Objective

A statement of what is intended, specifying the desired direction of change in trends.

Open Space

All space of public value, including public landscaped areas, playing fields, parks and play areas, and also including not just land, but also areas of water such as rivers, canals, lakes and reservoirs, which can offer opportunities for sport and recreation or can also act as a visual amenity and a haven for wildlife.

Partners

Other local/National Park authority departments and statutory bodies where the LDP will help to deliver some of the objectives of their strategies. Partners may be expected to contribute to formulating relevant parts of the LDP.

Planning Obligation

A legal agreement between an applicant and the local planning authority to ensure a development is carried out in a certain way. Also referred to as a Section 106 Agreement.

Planning Policy Wales (PPW)

Planning Policy Wales sets out the land use planning policies of the Welsh Assembly Government. It is supplemented by a series of Technical Advice Notes. Procedural advice is provided through circulars and policy clarification letters.

Playing Fields

Land set out with a pitch or pitches for games.

Pre-deposit documents (LDP)

These include the vision, strategic options, preferred strategy, key policies, the Sustainability Appraisal report, the candidate sites register, Review Report (if appropriate).

Pre-deposit stage

The participation and consultation stages prior to deposit; the Manual refers to the Strategic Options and Preferred Strategy stage which relate to the full plan procedure; reduced requirements relate to the short form plan revision procedure.

Previously Developed Land

Land which is or was occupied by a permanent structure (excluding agricultural or forestry buildings) and associated fixed surface infrastructure. See also Definition of Previously Developed Land contained in PPW: Edition 9.

Ramsar

A wetland site of international importance for nature conservation. Designation is enabled by the Ramsar Convention 1971 whereby participating European Governments undertake to protect such areas.

Review Report

The required statutory report under S69 of the 2004 Act and/or Reg41; to conclude on the LDP revision procedure to be followed based on a clear assessment of what has been considered and what needs to change and why, based on evidence.

Ribbon Development

The linear extension of settlements, including frontage development along approach roads, resulting in the unnecessary intrusion of development into the countryside.

Section 106 Agreement

See Planning Obligations.

Single Integrated Plan (SIP)

Discharges statutory duties identified by Welsh Government (“Shared Purpose – Shared Delivery”, WG 2012), including Community Strategies; prepared by a Local Service Board. See “Local Well-being Plans” which are to replace SIPs”.

Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI)

Sites of Special Scientific Interest are notified by Natural Resources Wales (NRW) under legislation to afford protection to flora, fauna and geological or physiological feature of special interest.

Site specific allocations

Allocations of sites (proposals) for specific or mixed uses or development. Policies will identify any specific requirements for individual proposals with the allocations shown on the LDP’s proposals map.

Soundness

In order to be adopted, an LDP must be determined ‘sound’ by the examination Inspector (S64 of the 2004 Act). Tests of soundness tests and checks are identified in PPW.

Special Area of Conservation (SAC)

Sites of international conservation importance designated by the Welsh Ministers under the European Directive on the Conservation of Natural Habitats and Wild Flora and Fauna. In addition there are candidate SAC’s which should, as a matter of Government policy, be viewed as full SAC’s when examining land use impacts.

Special Protection Area (SPA)

Special Protection Areas For Wild Birds under The E.C. Council Directive On the Conservation of Wild Birds (79/4C9/EEC) provides for the protection, management and control of all species of naturally occurring wild birds.

Specific Policies

A suite of criteria-based policies which will ensure that all development within the area meets the aims and objectives set out in the Strategy.

Stakeholders

Interests directly affected by the LDP (and/or SEA) - involvement generally through representative bodies.

Statement of Common Ground (SocG)

The purpose of a SOCG is to establish the main areas of agreement between two or more parties on a particular issue.

Strategic Development Plan (SDP)

Provision is made under the Planning (Wales) Act 2015 for the preparation of SDP’s at a regional level. SDP will have regard to the NDF and responding at a regional level to strategic issues.

Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA)

Term used internationally to describe environmental assessment as applied to plans and programmes. SEA process is derived from European legislation and defined at European level – Directive 2001/42/EC. The Environmental Assessment of Plans and Programmes (Wales) Regulations 2004 (SEA Regulations) require a formal “environmental assessment of certain plans and programmes, including those in the field of planning and land use”.

Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG)

Forms a supplementary document/information in respect of the policies in an LDP. SPG does not form part of the development plan and is not subject to independent examination but must be consistent with the Plan and with national planning policy. Can be developed to consider individual or thematic aspects of the Plan and site allocations including masterplans.

Sustainability Appraisal (SA)

Tool for appraising policies to ensure they reflect sustainable development objectives (i.e. social, environmental and economic factors). Each LPA is required by S62(6) of the 2004 Act to undertake SA of the LDP. This form of SA fully incorporates the requirements of the SEA Regulations.

Sustainability Appraisal Report (SA Report)

Document required to be produced as part of the SA process to describe and appraise the likely significant effects on sustainability of implementing the LDP, which also meets the requirement for the Environmental Report under the SEA Regulations. S62(6) of the 2004 Act requires each LPA to prepare a report of the findings of the SA of the LDP. The SA Report is first produced at the Preferred Strategy stage (the Interim SA Report), expanded at the Deposit LDP stage and finalised alongside the Adoption Statement.

Technical Advice Notes (TAN)

A topic-based document published by the Welsh Assembly Government to supplement Planning Policy Wales.

Wales Spatial Plan (WSP)

A plan prepared and approved by the National Assembly for Wales under S60 of the 2004 Act, which sets out a strategic framework to guide future development and policy interventions, whether or not these relate to formal land use planning control. Under S62(5)(b) of the 2004 Act a local planning authority must have regard to the WSP in preparing an LDP.


 

Appendix 1: Policy Assessment

 

Strategic Policy: SP1 Strategic Growth

Strategic Objectives

SO3 - To assist in widening and promoting education and skills training opportunities for all.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Early Intervention - To make sure that people have the right help at the right time; as and when they need it.

 

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

Strategic Policy: SP2 Retail and Town Centres

Strategic Objectives

SO4 - To ensure that the principles of equal opportunities and social inclusion are upheld by promoting access to a high quality and diverse mix of public services, healthcare, shops, leisure facilities and work opportunities, as well as vibrant town centres.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Early Intervention - To make sure that people have the right help at the right time; as and when they need it.

 

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

 

Strategic Policy: SP3 Providing New Homes

Strategic Objectives

SO10 - To make provision for an appropriate mix of quality homes across the County based around the principles of sustainable socio-economic development and equality of opportunities.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

Strategic Policy: SP4 Affordable Homes

Strategic Objectives

SO10 - To make provision for an appropriate mix of quality homes across the County based around the principles of sustainable socio-economic development and equality of opportunities.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

Strategic Policy: SP5 Strategic Sites

Strategic Objectives

SO12 - To encourage investment & innovation in rural and urban areas by making adequate provision to meet employment need and to contribute at a regional level to the delivery of the Swansea Bay City Deal.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

Strategic Policy: SP6 Employment and the Economy

Strategic Objectives

SO12 - To encourage investment & innovation in rural and urban areas by making adequate provision to meet employment need and to contribute at a regional level to the delivery of the Swansea Bay City Deal.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

Strategic Policy: SP7 Welsh Language and Culture

Strategic Objectives

SO11 - To assist in protecting, enhancing and promoting the Welsh Language and the County’s unique cultural identity, assets and social fabric.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

Strategic Policy: SP8 Infrastructure

Strategic Objectives

SO14 - To reflect the requirements associated with the delivery of new development, both in terms of hard and soft infrastructure (including broadband).

 

Local Well-being Goals

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

Strategic Policy: SP9 Gypsy and Traveller Provision

Strategic Objectives

SO10 - To make provision for an appropriate mix of quality homes across the County based around the principles of sustainable socio-economic development and equality of opportunities.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

Strategic Policy: SP10 The Visitor Economy

Strategic Objectives

SO13 - To make provision for sustainable & high quality all year round tourism related initiatives.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

Strategic Policy: SP11 Placemaking, Sustainability and High Quality Design

Strategic Objectives

SO9 - To protect and enhance the diverse character, distinctiveness, safety and vibrancy of the County’s communities by promoting a place making approach and a sense of place.  

 

Local Well-being Goals

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

Strategic Policy: SP12 Rural Development

Strategic Objectives

SO2 - To assist with widening and promoting wellbeing opportunities through access to community, leisure and recreational facilities as well as the countryside.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Healthy Habits - People have a good quality of life, and make healthy choices about their lives and environment.

 

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

Strategic Policy: SP13 Protection and Enhancement of the Natural Environment

Strategic Objectives

SO1 - To ensure that the natural environment, including habitats and species, are safeguarded and enhanced.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Healthy Habits - People have a good quality of life, and make healthy choices about their lives and environment.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

 

 

 

Strategic Policy: SP14 Protection and Enhancement of the Built and Historic Environment

Strategic Objectives

SO5 - To safeguarded and enhance the built and historic environment and promote the appropriate reuse of redundant buildings.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Healthy Habits - People have a good quality of life, and make healthy choices about their lives and environment.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

Strategic Policy: SP15 Climate Change

Strategic Objectives

SO7 - To make a significant contribution towards tackling the cause and adapting to the effect of climate change, including promoting the efficient use and safeguarding of resources.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Strong Connections - Strongly connected people, places and organisations that are able to adapt to change.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

Strategic Policy: SP16 Sustainable Distribution – Settlement Framework

Strategic Objectives

SO6 - To ensure that the principles of spatial sustainability are upheld by directing development to sustainable locations with access to services and facilities and wherever possible encouraging the reuse of previously developed land.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Strong Connections - Strongly connected people, places and organisations that are able to adapt to change.

 

Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

Strategic Policy: SP17 Transport and Accessibility

Strategic Objectives

SO8 - To contribute to the delivery of an accessible integrated and sustainable transport system, including links to alternative transport methods.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Strong Connections - Strongly connected people, places and organisations that are able to adapt to change.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

Strategic Policy: SP18 Mineral Resources

Strategic Objectives

SO7 - To make a significant contribution towards tackling the cause and adapting to the effect of climate change, including promoting the efficient use and safeguarding of resources.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Strong Connections - Strongly connected people, places and organisations that are able to adapt to change.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

 

 

 

Strategic Policy: SP19 Waste Management

Strategic Objectives

SO7 - To make a significant contribution towards tackling the cause and adapting to the effect of climate change, including promoting the efficient use and safeguarding of resources.

 

Local Well-being Goals

Strong Connections - Strongly connected people, places and organisations that are able to adapt to change.

 

Monitoring

The following indicators will monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

 

To be developed as part of the deposit LDP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Appendix 2 - Strategic Sites - Maps

To be inserted



[1] The Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 and the Local Development Plan (LDP) Regulations 2005 sets the framework and legal context for the preparation of Local Development Plans in Wales.

[2] https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/media/1213042/ldp-review-report-english-version.pdf

[3] https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/home/council-services/planning/local-development-plan-2018-2033/delivery-agreement/#.W3bSe-aouUk

 

[4] http://www.thecarmarthenshirewewant.wales/

[5] https://gov.wales/topics/planning/policy/ppw/?lang=en

 

[6] https://gov.wales/topics/planning/policy/tans/?lang=en

 

[7] To be adopted, a Local Development Plan must be determined ‘sound’ by the examination Inspector (section 64 of the 2004

Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act). Tests of soundness and checks are identified in Planning Policy Wales Edition 9 and the Approved Revised LDP Delivery Agreement.

[8] The 15 Well-being Objectives are defined within – Moving Forward in Carmarthenshire: The Council’s New Corporate Strategy 2018 – 2033 (https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/media/1214849/corporate-strategy-18-23.pdf)

 

[9] https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/home/council-services/planning/local-development-plan-2018-2033/sustainability-appraisal-strategic-environmental-assessment/#.W4klWuaouUk

 

[10] Welsh Government Local Development Plan Manual – Edition 2 August 2015, Section 6.1.1

[11] Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015

[12] http://www.thecarmarthenshirewewant.wales/

 

[13]   http://www.thecarmarthenshirewewant.wales/media/8331/carmarthenshire-well-being-plan-final-may-2018.pdf

 

[14] Detailed information, including the engagement undertaken is set out within the Issues Vision and Objectives Topic Paper.

[15] Detailed information is set out within the Issues Vision and Objectives Topic Paper.

[16] Planning Policy Wales, Edition 9 (Section 2.2.1) and Welsh Government Local Development Plan Manual – Edition 2 – August 2015, Section 6.1.1

[17] https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/home/council-democracy/strategies-and-plans/moving-forward-in-carmarthenshire-the-next-5-years/

[18] Paragraph 8.2.1.2 of the Welsh Government Local Development Plan Manual – Edition 2

[19] https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/media/1212564/employment-sectoral-study-final-english-1.pdf

[20] Regional Local Housing Market Assessment is being undertaken which will inform the revised LDP as it progresses through the preparatory process.

[21] The table will be populated as part of the preparation of the Deposit LDP.

[22] http://www.swanseabaycitydeal.wales/life-science-and-well-being/life-science-and-well-being-village/

[23] https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/home/business/development-investment/delta-lakes/#.W5kToOmQy70

[24] http://www.swanseabaycitydeal.wales/economic-acceleration/yr-egin-creative-digital-cluster/

[25] Carmarthenshire’s Wellbeing Objectives 2018-18

[26] Cymraeg 2050 A Million Welsh Speakers, Welsh Government (2017)

[27] Community Infrastructure Levy Regulations 2010 (as amended); Planning Policy Wales; Welsh Office Circular 13/97 Planning Obligations

[28] https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/home/business/tourism/statistics-and-trends/#.W59p--mQy70

[29] https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/home/business/tourism/tourism-priorities/cycling/#.W59p3umQy70

[30] Planning Policy Wales; Technical Advice Note 6 Planning for Sustainable Rural Communities (July 2010)

[31] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 9 Para 4.6.4. https://gov.wales/docs/desh/publications/161117planning-policy-wales-edition-9-en.pdf

 

[32]Planning Policy Wales (Edition 9)